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Defense Contract Fraud

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud in defense and military contracts. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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Whistleblowing As a Civic Duty: Now Is the Time To Act

Posted  10/23/20
By Edward Baker
Whistleblower in Text
With voting in the 2020 election underway and the presidential debates behind us, now is a good time to reflect on the importance of civic duties to the preservation of American democracy.  Voting, paying taxes, serving on a jury, and registering with selective service are all examples of such duties—responsibilities which, if ignored or unfulfilled by enough individuals, will cause the institutional fabric holding...

This Week in Whistleblower History: The Hall Carbine Affair and Defense Procurement Fraud

Posted  10/2/20
This week marks the first public unveiling of a fascinating—and still disputed—event in whistleblower history called the “Hall Carbine Affair.”  Arising out of the investigative activities of a U.S. House Special Committee at the start of the Civil War into rampant defense procurement fraud, the scandal involved the government sale and then repurchase of obsolete rifles for the Union Army at grossly inflated...

August 20, 2020

Defense contractor Islands Mechanical Contractor, Inc. (IMC) has paid the United States $1.1 million to settle claims of improperly submitting equitable adjustment claims relating to a delayed facility construction project at Guantanamo Bay.  An investigation by the Defense Contract Audit Agency had found that IMC’s claims for equipment and worker standby costs were based on misrepresented information, as both the equipment and workers listed on the claims had been reallocated to other projects and were no longer on standby.  USAO MDFL

July 20, 2020

Defense contractor iNovex Information Systems, Inc., will pay $1 million to resolve claims that it violated the FCA by overcharging the National Security Agency.  Defendant allegedly invoiced the NSA for services it claimed were provided by personnel who met contractually specified training and qualification requirements when, in fact, it knew that those employees did not meet all of the specialized qualifications.  USAO MD

This Week in Whistleblower History: House Resolution on July 8, 1861 Led to the Original False Claims Act

Posted  07/10/20
By Edward Baker
Photo of Winder Building in Washington DC
This week marks an important event in whistleblower history.  On July 8, 1861, Congressman Charles H. Van Wyck of New York submitted a resolution to the U.S. House of Representatives to create a special committee of five members appointed by the Speaker of the House to investigate fraud and profiteering in military contracts during the Civil War.  The committee’s investigations ultimately led to the enactment of...

June 22, 2020

A former employee of Schneider Electric Buildings America, Bhaskar Patel, has been sentenced to three years of probation and ordered to forfeit over $2.5 million in connection with a five-year bribery scheme involving several federal energy savings performance contracts.  Patel had pleaded guilty to soliciting and receiving over $2.5 million in bribes from eight Schneider subcontractors on the contracts, which included a $24.7 million project for the USDA in California, two projects amounting to $34.4 million for the GSA in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, a $42.4 million project for the VA in the Northeast, a $70 million project for the Coast Guard in Puerto Rico, and a $114.3 million project for the Navy in California.  USAO VT

Catch of the Week: Tacoma foundry pays 10.8M settlement over deficient steel parts destined for U.S. Navy submarines, falsified tests

Posted  06/18/20
US-Navy-ships-in-the-middle-of-the-ocean
The latest in our Catch of the Week series features Bradken Inc.’s $10.8 million payment to resolve allegations that its Tacoma foundry violated the False Claims Act (“FCA”) when it produced and sold substandard steel parts for U.S. Navy submarines and falsified test results to hide the failures. Bradken and its former lab director Elaine Thomas also face criminal charges. The company accepted responsibility and...

June 16, 2020

The U.S. Navy’s leading supplier of high-yield steel for submarines, Bradken Inc., has agreed to pay $10.8 million and comply with a three-year deferred prosecution agreement in order to settle allegations it violated the False Claims Act through its Tacoma foundry producing and selling steel that failed to meet certain strength standards required by the Navy.  In 2017, the defense contractor discovered and self-disclosed that test results for a substantial portion of its steel productions, spanning thirty years, had been improperly altered by then director of metallurgy, Elaine Thomas, causing shipbuilders to submit false claims to the Navy.  DOJ; USAO WDWA

June 12, 2020

A major Virginia-based defense contractor, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), has paid $5.98 million to settle claims arising from a self-disclosure that it violated the False Claims Act on a contract to provide IT support to the U.S. Army.  According to SAIC, employees working on newer projects that were not yet funded had billed their time to older projects that were funded.  When funding became available on the newer projects, employees working on the older projects then billed their time to the newer project.  USAO SDCA

June 10, 2020

A South Korean engineering company has been ordered to pay $68 million in criminal fines, civil penalties, and restitution after pleading guilty to defrauding the U.S. Army in a 2008 contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars.  According to the press release, SK Engineering & Construction Co. Ltd. (SK) submitted documents to the Army that were doctored to conceal $2.6 million in payments to a fake construction company that had bribed an Army Corps of Engineers official on SK’s behalf.  The company also took steps to hamper investigations by U.S. and Korean officials by withholding and destroying relevant documents, attempting to tamper with a potential witness, and failing to properly discipline the employees involved with the bribery scheme.  SK was suspended from participating in certain contracts with the U.S. government in 2017; with this plea agreement, it will undergo another three years of probation.  DOJ
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