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June 20, 2019

To settle charges of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), Walmart Inc. and its Brazilian subsidiary, WMT Brasilia S.a.r.l., have agreed to pay $138 million to the DOJ and $144 million to the SEC, for a combined penalty of $282 million.  According to the DOJ and SEC, Walmart’s alleged failure to implement and maintain adequate internal anti-corruption controls from 2000 to 2011 resulted in bribes to government officials in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico that allowed Walmart’s foreign subsidiaries to open more stores faster.  For cooperating with all investigations and self-disclosing some of the alleged misconduct, Walmart received a reduction of 20-25% off the amount originally owed to the DOJ.  In addition to the monetary penalty, Walmart has agreed to retain an outside compliance monitor for two years.  DOJ, SEC, USAO EDVA

April 9, 2019

London-based Standard Chartered Bank has agreed to pay $1.1 billion to resolve criminal charges and related allegations of unlawful conduct by the Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), the Federal Reserve, the New York Department of Financial Services, the New York County District Attorney's Office, and the United Kingdom's Financial Conduct Authority. As part of the settlement, Standard Chartered admitted that it processed thousands of financial transactions worth hundreds of millions of dollars through U.S. financial institutions for the benefit of Iranian and other entities and individuals subject to sanctions. In addition, Standard Chartered admitted that it had deficiencies in its compliance programs and had falsified the records of New York financial institutions.  In addition to the financial penalties, Standard Chartered agreed to the extension of an existing deferred prosecution agreement through 2021, and committed to undertaking specified compliance initiatives.  DOJ; Treasury; Fed; DANY; UK

March 29, 2019

A German provider of dialysis products and services has agreed to pay a total of $231 million to the DOJ and SEC for violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). Fresenius Medical Care AG & Co. KGaA (FMC) admitted to paying $30 million in bribes to government officials throughout Africa, the Middle East, and other regions, in order to procure business that eventually earned it over $140 million in profits. Although it voluntarily self-disclosed the misconduct in 2012, the misconduct continued in certain countries until 2016. As part of the resolution, Fresenius has entered into a non-prosecution agreement with the DOJ and will pay $85 million in criminal penalties to the DOJ, as well as $147 million in disgorgement and interest to the SEC. DOJ; SEC; USAO MA

March 6, 2019

A Russian telecommunications provider agreed to pay $850 million to the U.S. resolve charges that it violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) in seeking to win business in Uzbekistan. Over a period of eight years, Mobile TeleSystems PJSC (MTS) allegedly paid at least $120 million in bribes to an Uzbek official who held sway over the country's telecommunications regulatory authority, resulting in more than $2.4 billion in company revenues. MTS also agreed to a $100 million settlement with the SEC, included within the total $850 million settlement. DOJ; SEC; USAO SDNY

February 15, 2019

Cognizant Technology Solutions Corporation will pay $25 million to settle charges that it violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) in paying a $3.6 million in bribes to government officials in India in connection with construction of facilities for Cognizant in Chennai.  Cognizant’s president, Gordon Coburn, and chief legal officer, Steven E. Schwartz, have been charged by the SEC for authorizing payment and concealment of the bribe.  SEC

December 26, 2018

Brazil-based Centrais Elétricas Brasileiras S.A. will pay a $2.5 million fine to the SEC for violations of the FCPA arising from an illicit bid-rigging and bribery scheme among certain private Brazilian construction companies involving the construction of a nuclear power plant.  The SEC also found material weaknesses in Eletrobras' internal control over financial reporting.  SEC

December 26, 2018

Polycom, Inc., a San Jose, California based provider of communications products, has agreed to pay more than $16 million to settle charges that it violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).  Polycom's Chinese subsidiary used its local distributors and resellers to make illicit payments to Chinese government officials in exchange for assistance in securing deals for Polycom products, with managers recording false details about the transactions.  SEC

November 27, 2018

Following a guilty plea for receiving over $1 billion in bribes, the former Venezuelan national treasurer, Alejandro Andrade Cedeno ("Andrade"), was sentenced to ten years in prison and agreed to a forfeiture money judgment of $1 billion.  Andrade received the bribes in cash as well as private jets, yachts, cars, homes, champion horses, and high-end watches, in exchange for selecting the bribers to conduct currency exchange transactions for the Venezuelan government. DOJ

November 20, 2018

The owner of Venezuelan news network Globovision, Raul Gorrin Balisario, has been charged in an international money-laundering conspiracy that included the payment of millions of dollars in bribes to two high-level Venezuelan officials to secure the rights to conduct foreign currency exchange transactions at favorable rates for the Venezuelan government.  Two others pleaded guilty to charges arising under the same scheme.  Alejandro Andrade Cedeno, the former Venezuelan national treasurer, admitted to receiving over $1 billion in bribes.  Gabriel Arturo Jimenez Aray, the former owner of Banco Peravia in the Dominican Republic, admitted that he conspired with Gorrin and others to acquire the bank, through which he helped launder bribe money and other proceeds of the scheme.  DOJ; USAO SDFL

November 14, 2018

The United States and three South Korea-based companies, SK Energy Co. Ltd., GS Caltex Corporation, and Hanjin Transportation Co. Ltd., have reached an agreement to resolve criminal and civil claims arising from the defendants' alleged bid-rigging and price-fixing in contracts to supply fuel to U.S. military bases in South Korea.  As a result of this conduct, the Department of Defense paid substantially inflated prices for fuel supply services in South Korea. Defendants agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay a total of $236 million -- $82 million in criminal fines and $154 million for civil antitrust and False Claims Act violations related to the bid-rigging conspiracy.  The False Claims Act civil investigation resulted from a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  The settlement is part of an ongoing federal investigation into bid rigging, price fixing and other anticompetitive conduct targeting U.S. Department of Defense fuel supply contracts in South Korea; the defendants have agreed to cooperate with that investigation.  DOJ
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