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Bribery and Bid-Rigging

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to bribery and bid rigging in U.S. government contracting. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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June 25, 2021

UK-based global engineering company Amec Foster Wheeler Energy Limited, a subsidiary of John Wood Group plc, has agreed to pay more than $18 million and enter into a three-year deferred prosecution agreement to settle foreign bribery charges involving a $190 million contract from state-owned Petróleo Brasileiro S.A. (Petrobras) to design a gas-to-chemicals complex in Brazil.  Through employees located in New York and Texas, Amec Foster Wheeler allegedly conspired with others to pay bribes to win the contract, earning at least $12.9 million in profit as a result.  USAO EDNY

June 25, 2021

Multinational telecommunications and internet service provider Level 3 Communications, LLC has agreed to pay over $12.7 million to resolve claims a former employee brought under the False Claims Act, alleging violations of the Anti-Kickback Act, False Claims Act, and Procurement Integrity Act.  Under a contract with the General Services Administration, Level 3 allegedly accepted kickbacks from subcontractors MSO Tech, Inc. and P.V.S. Inc. in exchange for steering work to them.  Additionally, under a contract with the Department of Homeland Security, Level 3 allegedly maintained that subcontractor PVS qualified as a contractually obligated woman-owned small business when in fact PVS is owned by a man.  USAO EDVA

June 7, 2021

An engineering firm in North Carolina, Contech Engineered Solutions LLC (Contech), has been ordered to pay $7 million in criminal fines and over $1.5 million in restitution to the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT).  Contech admitted that it conspired to rig bids and defraud the NCDOT, fraudulently obtaining contracts over a ten-year period.  DOJ charged a former Contech executive, Brent Brewbaker, as a co-defendant.  Brewbaker remains under indictment.  DOJ

May 28, 2021

Eric Pulier, who previously served as an executive at ServiceMesh, Inc., which later merged with Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), entered into a consent judgment for $4.8 million in disgorgement, civil penalties, and interest.  The judgment resolved an SEC action alleging that Pulier paid more than $2 million in bribes to executives at the Commonwealth Bank of Australia to secure business for CSC.  Securing the Australia business entitled ServiceMesh to a $98 million earn-out payment from the CSC acquisition, and Pulier was personally entitled to $30 million of that earn-out.  SEC

May 27, 2021

Bank Julius Baier & Co. Ltd. (BJB), a Swiss bank with international operations, will pay $79 million in penalties and enter into a three-year deferred prosecution agreement to resolve a criminal investigation into the bank’s involvement in a money laundering conspiracy that fueled an international soccer bribery scheme.  BJB admitted that it conspired to launder over $36 million in bribes through the United States to soccer officials with FIFA and other federations, in furtherance of a scheme in which sports marketing companies bribed soccer officials in exchange for broadcasting rights to soccer matches.  BJB’s Anti-Money Laundering controls failed to detect or prevent the money laundering, despite knowing that certain client accounts were associated with international soccer, which was generally understood to involve high-corruption risks.  A BJB executive directed that the opening of these accounts be fast-tracked in the hope that the clients would provide lucrative business.  DOJ

March 19, 2021

Humanitarian organization the International Rescue Committee, which contracted with USAID to provide humanitarian assistance for internally-displaced persons in Syria, will pay $6.9 million in a settlement resolving claims under the False Claims Act. The settlement followed an investigation by the USAID OIG into an alleged kickback and bid-rigging scheme involving IRC’s acquisition of goods and services between 2012 and 2015, which resulted in USAID paying inflated prices.  USAO DC

Top Ten Whistleblower Awards for 2020

Posted  01/22/21
2020 was another strong year for whistleblowers, who once again collectively recovered billions of dollars for the government and hundreds of millions of dollars in whistleblower rewards through their filing of lawsuits under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  Whistleblowers this past year also continued to secure financial rewards under the Dodd-Frank SEC Whistleblower and CFTC Whistleblower programs,...

Top Ten Non-Healthcare False Claims Act Recoveries of 2020

Posted  01/14/21
Lincoln bill zoomed on his face
This year’s Top Ten Non-Healthcare False Claims Act Recoveries demonstrates the False Claims Act’s power to combat an array of corporate misconduct spanning diverse industries. In 2020, the United States recovered hundreds of millions in taxpayer funds obtained through claims rendered false by bribery and bid-rigging schemes, mortgage underwriting fraud, avoided import duties, fraudulent loan applications, and...

Top Ten Federal Financial Fraud Recoveries of 2020

Posted  01/14/21
man pocketing cash in suit
The U.S. government has many enforcement options for financial and investment fraud, including those that provide for whistleblower rewards such as the SEC Whistleblower Program, the CFTC Whistleblower Program, and the IRS Whistleblower Program.  These programs, along with a new one under the Anti-Money-Laundering Act of 2020, are open for business and promise to pay millions of dollars in whistleblower awards in...

January 4, 2021

Georgia-based ready-mix concrete company Argos USA LLC entered into a settlement admitting that between 2010 and 2016 it conspired to fix prices, rig bids, and allocate the market for ready-mix concrete in Georgia and elsewhere.  As part of a deferred prosecution agreement, Argos will pay a $20 million criminal penalty, institute a compliance program, and cooperate in ongoing investigations.  The unlawful actions included coordinated issuance of price-increase letters, the allocation of specific ready-mix jobs in the coastal Georgia area, the imposition of fuel surcharges and environmental fees, and the submission of bids at collusive and noncompetitive prices.  DOJ
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