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Bribery and Bid-Rigging

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to bribery and bid rigging in U.S. government contracting. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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October 4, 2019

Zaldy Sabino, formerly a contracting officer with the U.S. State Department, has been convicted of charges related to contracting fraud.  Sabino received hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash from the owner of a construction firm in Turkey that had multiple multi-million dollar contracts with the State Department.  Sentencing is set for February, 2020.  DOJ

September 26, 2019

A military contractor who previously plead guilty to accepting illegal kickbacks and committing wire fraud has been sentenced to over 2 years in prison and ordered to pay $1.4 million in restitution.  Despite being the true owner of Walsh Construction Services, LLC, James Conway concealed his ownership by signing contracts under Keith Walsh, a fictitious name.  He then used Walsh Construction to bill for $1.4 million of work the contractor purportedly performed at Picatinny Arsenal and Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, as well as collect on $180,345 of kickbacks from four subcontractors.  In addition to the prison term and restitution order, Conway was sentenced to three years of supervised release.  USAO NJ

September 19, 2019

Following his conviction at trial in September 2018, Azam Doost, the owner of a marble mining company in Afghanistan, has been sentenced to 4.5 years in prison, and ordered to pay $8.9 million in forfeiture and restitution to the government.  Doost had been convicted for his role in fraudulently obtaining and failing to repay a $15.8 million loan from the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, a U.S. government agency, to Equity Capital Mining LLC, which Doost owned at the time.  DOJ

How Businesses Can Use Whistleblower Reward Laws to Stop Unfair Competition

Posted  07/22/19
Runner in track race starting before other racers
Most anyone can be a whistleblower. The role is not limited to the corporate insider or company employee at the meeting, on the conference call or in receipt of the email or text message where the “smoking-gun” evidence of fraud or misconduct is disclosed. Whistleblowers can be any person, or an entity, with non-public information about fraudulent conduct giving rise to a whistleblower claim.  Often, businesses...

June 20, 2019

To settle charges of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), Walmart Inc. and its Brazilian subsidiary, WMT Brasilia S.a.r.l., have agreed to pay $138 million to the DOJ and $144 million to the SEC, for a combined penalty of $282 million.  According to the DOJ and SEC, Walmart’s alleged failure to implement and maintain adequate internal anti-corruption controls from 2000 to 2011 resulted in bribes to government officials in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico that allowed Walmart’s foreign subsidiaries to open more stores faster.  For cooperating with all investigations and self-disclosing some of the alleged misconduct, Walmart received a reduction of 20-25% off the amount originally owed to the DOJ.  In addition to the monetary penalty, Walmart has agreed to retain an outside compliance monitor for two years.  DOJ, SEC, USAO EDVA

Whistleblowers Needed to Stop Secret Kickbacks, Bribes, Overcharging, and False Costs in E-Rate, Lifeline, Connect America, and Rural Healthcare programs

Posted  06/7/19
By Jessica T. Moore
Large broadband cable bales awaiting installation on rural road.
The FCC disburses billions of dollars every year for its massive Universal Service Fund (USF) and its laudable mission to promote telephone and internet access to all U.S. persons regardless of income and location. This massive pot of government money attracts a commensurate measure of opportunists seeking to defraud these well-meaning programs.

What is the Universal Service Fund?

The Universal Service Fund...

May 31, 2019

Generic drug maker Heritage Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has entered into a deferred prosecution agreement for criminal antitrust charges, admitting that it conspired to fix prices, rig bids, and allocate customers for the diabetes drug glyburide.  Heritage will pay a $225,000 criminal penalty and has agreed to cooperate in ongoing antitrust investigations.  In addition, Heritage will pay $7.1 million to resolve allegations under the False Claims Act that the company paid and received unlawful remuneration under the Anti-Kickback Statute through its arrangements with other generic drug makers regarding prices, supply, and allocation of customers for drugs including glyburide, hydralazine, and theophylline.  DOJ; USAO ED Pa

WATCH THIS SPACE: Proposed $700M Fix for Installed Foreign-Telecom Could Compound Fraud Related to Universal-Service-Fund Projects

Posted  05/31/19
Hand touching lock icon on modern digital screen interface stating “hacking detected” and “security breach”
Congress, the President, and the FCC are moving to restrict and phase out foreign-made telecommunications components seen as national security risks. While the president’s executive order of May 15, 2019 prohibits U.S. companies from buying foreign telecom, we have a huge problem: our systems already have large quantities of this equipment installed – antennas, radios, electronics, routers, services, etc. The...

May 15, 2019

Robert C. Leonard, CEO of Force Multiplier Solutions, has been ordered to pay $125 million in restitution for his part in a bribery scheme which took down public officials and brought about the collapse of Dallas County Schools. Mr. Leonard pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit honest services wire fraud and was sentenced to seven years in federal prison.  DOJ

May 10, 2019

Broker-dealer Banca IMI Securities Corp. pleaded guilty to criminal antitrust charges arising from a conspiracy to rig bids to borrow pre-release American Depository Receipts (ADRs) from one of the depository banks permitted to create ADRs.  The depository bank instituted an auction process for pre-release ADRs, and Banca IMI conspired with others to submit artificially low, sometimes identical, bids, to the bank.  Banca IMI will pay a criminal fine of $2 millionDOJ
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