Contact

Click here for a confidential contact or call:

1-212-350-2764

Contract Non-Compliance

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud arising from or resulting in non-compliance with government contracts. You may also be interested in the following pages:

Page 11 of 11

Northrop Grumman — Government Contracting Fraud/Failure to Test ($12.5 million).

One of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Allen Davis, a former quality assurance manager at Northrop’s Navigation Systems Division facility in Salt Lake City, who brought a qui tam action under the False Claims Act, alleging the defense contractor failed to test properly certain commercial parts it supplied for navigation systems in warplanes, submarines and space equipment. Northrop ultimately settled the case for $12.5 million with Mr. Davis receiving a portion of that amount as a whistleblower award. See Reuters for more.

Tyco — Government Contracting Fraud/Noncompliance with Industry Standards ($60 million).

One of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Nora Armenta and dozens of California municipalities in a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against Tyco International, Mueller Co., and the James Jones Company, alleging they sold waterworks parts to municipal water systems that were made with 40% more lead than allowed by industry standards. According to her complaint, Ms. Armenta repeatedly warned her superiors that the parts were for drinking water, but was ignored. The defendants settled the case, but only after 13 years of litigation, including three successful appeals that reversed unfavorable trial rulings. The defrauded municipalities received $60 million, and Ms. Armenta received a whistleblower reward of $15 million.

Northrop Grumman/TRW — Government Contracting Fraud/Defective Products ($325 million).

One of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Robert Ferro, who was a scientist for a TRW Inc. subcontractor, in a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against Northrop Grumman (which has since acquired TRW). Mr. Ferro alleged TRW sold classified “spy” satellites to the government with defective components that caused the satellites to fail while on orbit. According to the complaint, when Mr. Ferro brought the defect to the attention of TRW engineers, he was threatened and directed not to reveal the information to anyone in the government. Northrop ultimately settled the case for $325 million, the largest ever whistleblower settlement by a defense contractor. Mr. Ferro received a whistleblower award of $48.7 million. See NY Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and LA Times for more.
1 9 10 11

Newsletter

Subscribe to receive email updates from the Constantine Cannon blogs

Sign up for: