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Customs Fraud

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud in customs and tariffs. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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Bassett Mirror Company Will Pay $10.5M to Settle Whistleblower’s Customs Duties FCA Allegations

Posted  01/17/18
By the C|C Whistleblower Lawyer Team Bassett Mirror Company, a Virginia-based home furnishings company, has agreed to pay the United States $10.5 million to resolve allegations it evaded antidumping duties on wooden bedroom furniture imported from the People’s Republic of China over a five year period. Antidumping duties level the playing field for U.S. companies by protecting against foreign companies...

October 3, 2017

Pennsylvania garment wholesaler Notations, Inc. agreed to pay $1 million to settle charges of violating the False Claims Act by repeatedly ignoring warning signs that its business partners, Yingshun Garments Inc., Import Global Designs Inc., and Olgrem LLC, which imported garments from China, were engaged in a fraudulent double-invoicing scheme to underpay customs duties owed on the imported garments they sold to Notations.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  The whistleblower, Xing Wei, will receive an award from the proceeds of the government's recovery.  DOJ (SDNY)

U.S. Government Joins Constantine Cannon Case Brought By U.K. Whistleblower against British Retailer for Customs Fraud

Posted  09/8/17
By the C|C Whistleblower Lawyer Team Constantine Cannon LLP is pleased to announce that the U.S. Government has intervened in its client's whistleblower case against Pure Collection Ltd., a Harrogate, England-based e-retailer of luxury cashmere and apparel. The Government also brought claims against Pure's current acting CEO, Samantha Harrison. The whistleblower lawsuit, among one of the first whistleblower cases...

May 1, 2017

Texas-based importer Import Merchandising Concepts L.P. agreed to pay $275,000 to resolve allegations it improperly evaded customs duties on imports of wooden bedroom furniture from China by misclassifying the furniture as non-bedroom furniture, which is not subject to any antidumping duties. DOJ

DOJ Catch of the Week -- Import Merchandising Concepts

Posted  05/5/17
By the C|C Whistleblower Lawyer Team This week's Department of Justice "Catch of the Week" goes to Import Merchandising Concepts L.P.  On Monday, the Texas-based importer (and two affiliated individuals) agreed to pay $275,000 to settle charges of violating the False Claims Act by evading customs duties on imports of wooden bedroom furniture from China.  The company imports, among other things, bedroom furniture...

January 11, 2017

Volkswagen AG agreed to plead guilty to three criminal felony counts and pay a $2.8 billion criminal penalty as a result of the company’s long-running scheme to sell approximately 590,000 diesel vehicles in the U.S. by using a defeat device to cheat on emissions tests mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board, and lying and obstructing justice to further the scheme. In separate civil resolutions of environmental, customs and financial claims, VW also agreed to pay $1.5 billion for a total payout of $4.3 billion in criminal and civil penalties. DOJ

September 30, 2016

Daniel Scott Goldman and his companies, Ecologic Industries LLC and OMNI SCM LLC, agreed to pay $1,525,000 to settle charges of violating the False Claims Act by making false statements to avoid paying duties on wooden bedroom furniture imported from China.  According to the government, the defendants misclassified or conspired with others to misclassify wooden bedroom furniture on documents presented to U.S. Customs and Border Protection to avoid paying antidumping duties on Chinese imports of wooden bedroom furniture.  Specifically, Goldman and his companies allegedly classified the furniture as office and other types of furniture not subject to duties while selling the furniture in the student housing market for use in dormitory bedrooms.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed by Matthew L. Bissanti, Jr. under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  Bissanti will receive a whistleblower award of $228,750 from the proceeds of the government's recovery.  DOJ (WDTX)

DOJ Intervenes in Whistleblower-Initiated Customs Fraud Case (and, Likely Unintentionally, Potential Family Feud)

Posted  09/28/16
The Department of Justice’s (DOJ) intervention last week in a whistleblower-initiated False Claims Act case is going to make for an awkward holiday season for at least one family. The case, US ex rel. Xing Wei v. Yingshun Garments, Inc. et al, was filed in January 2013 in the Southern District of New York and alleges a scheme to avoid import duties on women’s clothing manufactured in China and sold to retailers in...

July 13, 2016

Clothing importer Motives, Inc. and its affiliated foreign clothing manufacturers Motives Far East and Motives China Ltd. agreed to pay $13.375 million to settle charges of violating the False Claims Act by engaging in a double invoicing scheme to defraud the United States out of millions of dollars in customs duties.  As part of the settlement, the companies admitted to and accepted responsibility for under-reporting the value of its imported merchandise.  Under the scheme, the companies used two sets of invoices: one that undervalued the garments and was presented to the government for calculation of the appropriate customs duty, and the second that reflected the actual value of the garments.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  The whistleblower will receive a yet-to-be-determined whistleblower award from the proceeds of the government's recovery.  DOJ (SDNY)

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