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Defense Contract Fraud

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud in defense and military contracts. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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October 6, 2021

Defense contractor Crane Company has agreed to pay over $4.5 million to resolve allegations of violating the False Claims Act.  According to a former Crane employee, Corla Jacobson, the failures occurred between 2011 and 2017 and involved selling the U.S. Navy high performance butterfly valves that did not conform to military specifications.  For initiating a successful qui tam action, Jacobson will receive a relator’s share of over $850,000.  USAO SDTX

August 18, 2021

Defense contractor Iris Kim, Inc. (“I-Tek”), together with its owner and four employees, were sentenced on criminal charges arising out of a fraudulent scheme to falsely qualify for Department of Defense and other federal government supply contracts set aside for service-disabled veterans, import Chinese-manufactured goods in violation of the terms of these contracts, and falsely relabel these goods as if they were made in the U.S.  The U.S. spent over $7 million on fraudulently-imported goods sold by I-Tek.  Owner Beyung S. Kim was sentenced to 58 months in prison, and the four employees were sentenced to a combined 93 months in prison.  USAO ED VA

July 20, 2021

Sage Consulting Group, Inc., and its president and owner Robert Pleghardt, agreed to pay $4.8 million to resolve claims that they paid kickbacks to two business, Wete & Company, Inc. and Index Systems, Inc., which were SBA certified as small businesses owned and operated by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals, to permit Sage to represent that those companies would be performing at least 50% of the work as subcontractors on Sage’s contracts with the Department of Defense Education Activity and Defense Human Resources Activity when, in fact, Sage performed 100% of the work.  USAO EDVA

July 6, 2021

Defense contractor AAR Corp. and its subsidiary, AAR Airlift Group Inc., have agreed to pay $11 million to resolve allegations of knowingly failing to maintain U.S. military aircrafts in accordance with U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) contracts.  The alleged False Claims Act violations involved nine helicopters that were deemed not airworthy and not mission capable as a result of the failures.  A former Airlift employee who filed the underlying qui tam complaint, Christopher Harvey, will receive over $2 million as part of the settlement.  USAO SDIL

June 4, 2021

Virginia-based 360 Patriot Enterprises, LLC and its former minority shareholder, Delaware-based 360 Ventures LLC have agreed to pay $1.12 million to resolve allegations that they fraudulently obtained two U.S. Army contracts intended for service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses (SDVOSB).  At the time the contracts were awarded (between 2015 to 2017), 360 Patriot was not controlled by a qualified SDVOSB.  USAO EDVA

May 27, 2021

Navistar Defense LLC, a manufacturer of military vehicles, will pay $50 million to resolve False Claims Act allegations that it fraudulently induced the U.S. Marine Corps to enter into a contract modification at inflated prices for a suspension system for armored vehicles known as Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles.  During negotiations for the modification, Navistar was asked to provide certain sales information to assess the reasonableness of Navistar’s proposed prices.  The U.S. alleged that Navistar provided the government with fraudulent sales invoices to justify the company’s prices, and that the government relied on these invoices during negotiations.  The investigation was initiated by a qui tam complaint filed by whistleblower Duquoin Burgess, a former Government Contracts Manager for Navistar, who will receive $11,060,000 from the settlement.  DOJ

April 29, 2021

California-based Tungsten Heavy Powder, Inc. (THP) has agreed to pay over $5.6 million to resolve a qui tam lawsuit by former employee Gregory Caputo and Global Tungsten & Powders Corporation.  In violation of the False Claims Act, THP allegedly falsely certified that certain defense articles procured by the Israeli government and financed by U.S. grant funds were sourced from and manufactured in the United States, when instead they were sourced from China and manufactured in Mexico.  For bringing the lawsuit, Caputo will receive a 17% share of the settlement proceeds.  USAO SDCA

Whistleblower Champion Chuck Grassley Pushes for Further Strengthening of False Claims Act (Again)

Posted  03/26/21
female standing proud with her silhouette as a superhero
Senator Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) already is celebrated as the modern-day champion of the False Claims Act.  This is the government's main fraud-fighting tool, which empowers whistleblowers to act as private attorneys general and sue on the government's behalf over fraud in government contracts and programs.  In successful cases, it rewards these whistleblowers with between 15% and 30% of the government's...

Catches of the Week: Contractors Abroad Face Liability for Fraud in U.S. Government Contracts

Posted  02/19/21
fleet of navy ships
This week, we double up on the Catch of the Week, and highlight two actions involving foreign contractors doing business with the U.S. Navy.

French Concrete Contractor Pays $14.5 Million to Resolve Claims of Delivering Substandard Concrete for U.S. Navy Bases in Africa

In the first case, Colas Djibouti, a subsidiary of French contractor Colas, agreed to pay $12.5m to the U.S. government to settle criminal charges,...

February 17, 2021

French contractor COLAS Djibouti SARL will pay a total of $14.5 million to resolve claims that it supplied substandard concrete under a contract with the U.S. Navy for construction of Navy airfields in the Republic of Djibouti.  Colas Djibouti was required to certify that concrete supplied met contractual specifications for composition and characteristics, but made fraudulent misrepresentations and created fictitious testing results regarding the concrete’s composition and characteristics.  Defendant entered into a deferred prosecution agreement on criminal claims, paying $12.5 million ($10 million in forfeiture and restitution, and $2.5 million as a criminal penalty).  Defendant also entered into a civil settlement for  $3.9 million, receiving a credit of $1.96 million for its payment under the DPA.  DOJ; USAO SD Cal
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