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Defense Contract Fraud

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud in defense and military contracts. You may also be interested in the following pages:

Page 18 of 18

October 10, 2014

Boeing entered in to a settlement that resolved allegations the aircraft maker improperly charged for labor costs under contracts with the U.S. Air Force for the maintenance and repair of C-17 Globemaster aircraft, one of the military’s major systems for transporting troops and cargo throughout the world.  Specifically, the government charged Boeing with intentionally billing the Air Force for a variety of labor costs in violation of applicable contract requirements, including for time its mechanics spent at meetings not directly related to the contracts. Boeing agreed to pay $23 million to resolve the matter. The settlement resolves allegations originally brought in a whistleblower lawsuit brought by present and former Boeing employees Clinton Craddock, Fred Van Shoubrouek, Anthony Rico and Fernando de la Garza. They will receive a combined whistleblower award of $3.9 million. DOJ

DOJ Catch of the Week -- DRS Technical Services

Posted  10/10/14
By the C|C Whistleblower Lawyer Team This week's Department of Justice "catch of the week" goes to DRS Technical Services Inc. Last Tuesday, the Virginia based telecommunications services provider agreed to pay $13.7 million to settle charges it violated the False Claims Act by overbilling the government for work performed by DRS personnel who lacked the job qualifications required by the company's government...

Ocean Carriers — Government Contracting Fraud/Prohibited Charges.

Two of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of a whistleblower who brought a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against two ocean carriers alleging they included in their government invoices charges specifically disallowed under the government contract. The ocean carriers did not have direct contracts with the government and submitted their invoices to parties who in turn presented them to the Department of Defense. Although the government declined to intervene because of uncertainties created by the lack of direct interaction between the defendants and the United States, our whistleblower lawyers pressed ahead, defeating multiple motions to dismiss and aggressively moving forward with discovery. The action settled with both defendants, and the whistleblower was awarded 28% of the government’s recovery. See Pacific Business News and Ship and Bunker News for more.

DC Circuit In KBR Whistleblower Case Tightens Attorney-Client Shield for Internal Investigations

Posted  07/3/14
By Gordon Schnell In a shot heard round the business world, a DC district court judge in March denied attorney-client privilege protection to documents prepared in connection with an internal company investigation. The judge found the privilege did not apply because the investigation was mandated by government regulation and not simply an exercise in company discretion. The DC Circuit last week -- in In re: Kellogg...

April 9, 2014

Five California-based masonry subcontractors, Frazier Masonry, F-Y Inc., CTI Concrete & Masonry, Masonry Technology, and Masonry Works, agreed to pay nearly $1.9M to resolve allegations they violated the False Claims Act by misrepresenting their disadvantaged small business status in connection with military construction contracts.  The allegations were first raised in a qui tam lawsuit filed by Rickey Howard, a former employee of Frazier Masonry, under the whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act.  Howard will receive a whistleblower award of $393,383.  DOJ

ATK — Government Contracting Fraud/Defective Product ($37 million).

One of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Kendall Dye, an engineer with what was formerly ATK Thiokol and is now ATK Launch Systems, who brought a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against ATK for selling defective flares to the United States military. According to the complaint, company testing revealed the flares could accidentally ignite if dropped from a height of as little as 11 inches. The flares burn at thousands of degrees, and are capable of burning through the hull of a ship, creating a significant safety risk. The government joined Mr. Dye’s case, and ATK ultimately settled for $37 million, with Mr. Dye receiving a whistleblower reward of $9 million. See NY Times for more.

Northrop Grumman — Government Contracting Fraud/Failure to Test ($12.5 million).

One of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Allen Davis, a former quality assurance manager at Northrop’s Navigation Systems Division facility in Salt Lake City, who brought a qui tam action under the False Claims Act, alleging the defense contractor failed to test properly certain commercial parts it supplied for navigation systems in warplanes, submarines and space equipment. Northrop ultimately settled the case for $12.5 million with Mr. Davis receiving a portion of that amount as a whistleblower award. See Reuters for more.

Northrop Grumman/TRW — Government Contracting Fraud/Defective Products ($325 million).

One of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Robert Ferro, who was a scientist for a TRW Inc. subcontractor, in a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against Northrop Grumman (which has since acquired TRW). Mr. Ferro alleged TRW sold classified “spy” satellites to the government with defective components that caused the satellites to fail while on orbit. According to the complaint, when Mr. Ferro brought the defect to the attention of TRW engineers, he was threatened and directed not to reveal the information to anyone in the government. Northrop ultimately settled the case for $325 million, the largest ever whistleblower settlement by a defense contractor. Mr. Ferro received a whistleblower award of $48.7 million. See NY Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post and LA Times for more.

Northrop Grumman/TRW — Government Contracting/Overcharging ($111 million).

One of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Richard Bagley, a former chief financial officer for TRW’s Redondo Beach unit, in a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against Northrop Grumman Corp. and TRW Inc. for overcharging the Department of Defense on various military programs. Mr. Bagley alleged that the defendants shifted costs from private contract work to government contracts, engaged in unlawful accounting methods, and manipulated their financial data to collect millions of dollars in excess payments on Defense Department programs. The government joined the case, and the defendants paid $111 million. Mr. Bagley received a whistleblower reward of $27 million. See NY Times and LA Times for more.
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