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Set-Asides and Preferences

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud in government contracting set-aside and preference programs. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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February 2, 2016

Colorado-based construction management company MCC Construction Company agreed to pay $1,769,294 in criminal penalties and forfeiture for conspiring to commit fraud on the United States by illegally obtaining government contracts that were intended for small, disadvantaged businesses.  According to court documents, MCC conspired with two companies that were eligible to receive federal government contracts set aside for small, disadvantaged businesses with the understanding that MCC would, illegally, perform all of the work.  In so doing, MCC was able to win 27 government contracts worth over $70 million from 2008 to 2011.  DOJ

July 6, 2015

LB&B Associates Inc. and its principals, Lily A. Brandon and F. Edward Brandon, agreed to pay $7.8 million to resolve allegations they made false statements to obtain contracts through the Small Business Administration’s (SBA’s) 8(a) Business Development Program for Small Disadvantaged Businesses.  The allegations first arose in a whistleblower lawsuit filed by Steven O. Sansbury and James T. Buechler, former employees of LB&B, under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  They will receive a whistleblower award of $1.5 million.  DOJ

April 21, 2015

R.J. Zavoral & Sons, Inc., John Zavoral, Peter Zavoral and Craig Pietruszewski agreed to pay $1.85 million to resolve allegations they violated the False Claims Act and the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act by making false statements to the Small Business Administration (SBA) and the US Army Corps of Engineers relating to the Heartsville Coulee Diversion construction contract they were awarded for flood control work in and around East Grand Forks, Minnesota.  DOJ

April 8, 2015

Orlando-based Air Ideal Inc. and its majority owner, Kim Amkraut, agreed to pay $250,000 to resolve allegations they made false statements to the Small Business Administration to improperly obtain certification as a Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone) company.  They must also pay five percent of Air Ideal’s gross revenues over the next five years.  Specifically, the government alleged Air Ideal used its fraudulently-procured HUBZone certification to obtain contracts from the US Coast Guard, US Army, US Army Corps of Engineers and the US Department of the Interior.  The allegations first arose in a whistleblower complaint filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act by Patricia Hopson.  She will receive a whistleblower award of $42,500.  DOJ

March 18, 2015

Gilbane Building Company agreed to pay $1.1 million to resolve allegations that W.G. Mills Incorporated (which Gilbane merged with in November 2010) violated the False Claims Act by creating a front company, Veterans Constructors Incorporated (VCI), in order to be awarded a Coast Guard contract that was designated for Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses.  VCI agreed to pay $50,000 plus five annual contingency payments equal to one percent of VCI’s total annual revenues to resolve the same allegations.  DOJ

November 19, 2014

Washington Gas Energy Systems agreed to pay more than $2.5M for conspiring to commit fraud by illegally obtaining contracts that were meant for small, disadvantaged businesses. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of WGL Holdings Inc., the parent company for all of the corporations within the Washington Gas family. According to the government, WGESystems conspired with a company that was eligible to receive federal government contracts set aside for small, disadvantaged businesses with the understanding that the business would illegally subcontract all of the work on the projects to WGESystems. In this way, WGESystems was able to capture a total of eight contracts worth almost $18M that should have gone to an eligible company. DOJ

October 29, 2014

North Florida Shipyards and its president, Matt Self, agreed to pay $1M to resolve allegations they violated the False Claims Act by creating a front company, Ind-Mar Services Inc., to improperly secure Coast Guard contracts that were designated for Service Disabled Veteran Owned Small Businesses (SDVOSBs). The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed by Robert Hallstein and Earle Yerger under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act. They will receive a whistleblower award of $180,000.DOJ

April 9, 2014

Five California-based masonry subcontractors, Frazier Masonry, F-Y Inc., CTI Concrete & Masonry, Masonry Technology, and Masonry Works, agreed to pay nearly $1.9M to resolve allegations they violated the False Claims Act by misrepresenting their disadvantaged small business status in connection with military construction contracts.  The allegations were first raised in a qui tam lawsuit filed by Rickey Howard, a former employee of Frazier Masonry, under the whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act.  Howard will receive a whistleblower award of $393,383.  DOJ

March 21, 2014

Utah-based Okland Construction Co. agreed to pay $928,000 to resolve allegations it made false statements and submitted false claims under the Small Business Administration’s Section 8(a) Program for Small and Disadvantaged Businesses.  The allegations were first raised in a qui tam lawsuit filed by Section 8(a) participant Saiz Construction Co. and its owner Abel Saiz under the whistleblower provisions of the False Claims Act.  They will receive a whistleblower award of $148,480.  DOJ
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