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Whistleblower Eligibility

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to whistleblower eligibility. You may also be interested in our pages:

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April 14, 2016

Boston Medical Center (BMC) and two of its physician practice organizations agreed to pay $1.1 million to resolve allegations they violated the False Claims Act by improperly billing Medicare and Medicaid.  Specifically, the government charged that (1) BMC billed Medicare for more units of Rituxan, an expensive cancer drug, than BMC actually infused in its patients; (2) BMC billed Medicare and Medicaid for services at its pre-surgical treatment center even though the global fee for the subsequent surgeries covered those same treatments; and (3) BMC submitted claims to Medicare for outpatient podiatry services where the clinical documentation did not support the reasonableness and necessity of the services.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act by BMC’s former Chief Compliance Officer, Kathleen Heffernan.  She will receive a yet-to-be-determined whistleblower award from the proceeds of the government's recovery.  DOJ (DMA)

DOJ Catch of the Week -- Kilgore Flares

Posted  04/1/16
By the C|C Whistleblower Lawyer Team This week's Department of Justice "Catch of the Week" goes to Tennessee-based defense contractor Kilgore Flares Company.  On Monday, the company and one of its subcontractors, New York-based ESM Group Inc., agreed to pay $8 million to resolve charges they violated the False Claims Act by selling defective infrared countermeasure flares to the U.S. Army and, for ESM, knowingly...

March 28, 2016

Tennessee-based defense contractor Kilgore Flares Company and one of its subcontractors, New York-based ESM Group Inc., agreed to pay $8 million to resolve charges they violated the False Claims Act by selling defective and illegally imported infrared countermeasure flares to the U.S. Army and, for ESM, knowingly evading U.S. customs duties.  The allegations first arose in a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act by Reade Manufacturing Company, a domestic manufacturer of magnesium powder which is used in the flares.  The company will receive a whistleblower award of $400,000 from the proceeds of the government’s recovery from ESM.  Whistleblower Insider  

February 29, 2016

Lockheed Martin Corporation (and subsidiaries Lockheed Martin Energy Systems and Lockheed Martin Utility Services) agreed to pay $5 million to resolve allegations they violated the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the False Claims Act by knowingly submitting false claims for payment under their contracts with the Department of Energy to operate the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Kentucky.  According to the government, Lockheed Martin violated the RCRA, which establishes how hazardous wastes must be managed, by failing to identify and report hazardous waste produced and stored at the facility, and failing to properly handle and dispose of the waste.  The government alleged that this conduct resulted in false claims for payment under Lockheed Martin’s contracts with the Department of Energy.  The allegations originated in two whistleblower lawsuits filed under the qui tam provision of the False Claims Act by the Natural Resources Defense Council and several former employees of Lockheed Martin who worked at the Paducah facility.  The whistleblowers will collectively receive a whistleblower award of $920,000 from the proceeds of the government's recovery.  DOJ

February 22, 2016

Pennsylvania-based importers Ameri-Source International Inc., Ameri-Source Specialty Products Inc., Ameri-Source Holdings Inc., their owners, Ajay Goel and Thomas Diener, and the related importer, SMC Machining LLC agreed to pay $3 million to resolve charges they violated the False Claims Act by engaging in a scheme to evade customs duties on imports of small-diameter graphite electrodes from China.  According to the government, Ameri-Source evaded antidumping duties on 15 shipments of the electrodes by misclassifying the size of the electrodes to avoid paying the duties, which do not apply to larger diameter graphite electrodes.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed by Graphite Electrode Sales Inc. under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  The company will receive a whistleblower award of approximately $480,000 from the proceeds of the government’s recovery.  Whistleblower Insider

DOJ Catch Of The Week -- Ameri-Source

Posted  02/26/16
By the C|C Whistleblower Lawyer Team This week's Department of Justice "Catch of the Week" goes to the Pennsylvania-based Ameri-Source importer companies -- Ameri-Source International Inc., Ameri-Source Specialty Products Inc., Ameri-Source Holdings Inc. -- their owners, Ajay Goel and Thomas Diener, and the related importer, SMC Machining LLC, incorporated at Goel’s direction and formerly owned by his wife.  On...

April 22, 2015

The SEC announced a whistleblower award of roughly $1.5 million to a compliance officer who had a reasonable basis to believe that disclosure to the SEC was necessary to prevent imminent misconduct from causing substantial financial harm to the company or investors.  This is the second award the SEC has made to an employee with internal audit or compliance responsibilities.  Whistleblower Insider

August 29, 2014

The SEC announced a whistleblower award of more than $300,000 to a company employee who performed audit and compliance functions and reported wrongdoing to the SEC after the company failed to take action when the employee reported it internally.  It is the first award for a whistleblower with an audit or compliance function at a company.  This particular whistleblower award recipient reported concerns of wrongdoing to appropriate personnel within the company, including a supervisor.  But when the company took no action on the information within 120 days, the whistleblower reported the same information to the SEC.  SEC

December 21, 2015

Texas-based University Furnishings LP and its general partner, Freedom Furniture Group Inc., agreed to pay $15 million to settle charges they violated the False Claims Act by making false statements to avoid paying duties on wooden bedroom furniture imported from China.  According to the government, between 2009 and mid-2012, University Furnishings misclassified wooden bedroom furniture on documents presented to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to avoid paying antidumping duties on imports of wooden bedroom furniture manufactured in China.  The companies allegedly classified the furniture as office and other types of furniture not subject to duties while selling the furniture in the student housing market for use in dormitory bedrooms.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit brought by University Loft Company under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  University Loft will receive a whistleblower award of $2.25 million from the proceeds of the government’s recovery. DOJ
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