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Lack of Medical Necessity

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud arising from medically unnecessary healthcare services. You may also be interested in our pages:

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Catch of the Week: University of Miami to Pay $22 Million to Resolve Allegations of Lab Test Fraud

Posted  05/14/21
By Leah Judge
University of Miami logo
The University of Miami will pay $22 million to resolve three False Claims Act lawsuits, the first of which was filed in 2013.  The government alleged that UM, which operates a medical school out of Jackson Memorial Hospital and an extensive health system spanning four south Florida counties, fraudulently billed government health care programs to boost declining revenues.  Jackson Memorial will separately pay $1.1...

May 10, 2021

The University of Miami, which operates multiple hospitals and other healthcare facilities, will pay $22 million to resolve claims arising from allegedly fraudulent billing submitted to federal healthcare programs for laboratory services.  The university was alleged to have billed certain laboratory tests as having been provided at hospital facilities instead of at physician offices, without satisfying the requirements for that more costly hospital facility billing, including notice requirements.  In addition, the university was alleged to have performed and billed for a pre-set panel of tests for all kidney transplant patients, although not all included tests were medically necessary.  Finally, the university and Jackson Memorial Hospital, which jointly operated the kidney transplant program, were alleged to have violated related party restrictions by billing for pre-transplant laboratory tests ordered by JMH from the university, and JMH will pay an additional $1.1 million to settle these allegations.  The settlement resolves claims made in three separate qui tam lawsuits; the whistleblower's share has not yet been determined.  DOJ; USAO SD FL

May 4, 2021

After being convicted of running a $11 million healthcare fraud scheme, Brenda Rodriguez, the owner and operator of Texas-based QC Medical Clinic, has been ordered to spend 25 years in prison, followed by 3 years of supervised release.  As shown by evidence presented at trial, Rodriguez’s scheme involved paying doctors to approve Medicare beneficiaries for home health services, selling the approvals to various home health providers, and causing the providers to bill Medicare for services that were medically unnecessary, never provided, and/or arose from illegal inducements.  USAO SDTX

Catch of the Week: Dozens of Fraudsters Sentenced in Multimillion Dollar Compounding Pharmacy Fraud

Posted  04/30/21
compounding pharmacy drugs
On Thursday, an Alabama District Court Judge sentenced dozens of defendants to prison for participating in a massive conspiracy to swindle insurers for medically unnecessary compound drugs. The defendants included company executives and managers, a prescriber, billers, and sales representatives associated with Northside Pharmacy, which was doing business as Global Compounding Pharmacy (Global). According to the DOJ...

April 29, 2021

Over two dozen defendants who were part of an extensive prescription drug fraud scheme involving Alabama-based Northside Pharmacy d/b/a Global Compounding Pharmacy have been sentenced to prison.  The defendants included company executives and managers, prescribers, billers, and sales representatives who, between 2013 and 2016, billed insurers such as Medicare and TRICARE for massive quantities of medically unnecessary prescription drugs.  In just that short period of time, the defendants caused insurers to pay nearly $50 million in medically unnecessary claims, with more than $13 million arising from improper payments to prescribers, and more than $8.4 million for prescriptions written out to Global employees themselves.  USAO NDAL

April 27, 2021

Indivior plc and Indivior Inc., will pay $300 million to settle claims from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, alleging they caused the misuse of state Medicaid funds by falsely marketing the drug Suboxone.  Suboxone is used by recovering opioid addicts to reduce withdrawal symptoms.  According to the governments, Indivior promoted the sale and use of Suboxone for unsafe, ineffective, and medically unnecessary purposes, including by claiming it was less susceptible to abuse even though the active ingredient, buprenorphine, is a powerful opioid itself.  Additionally, the company took steps to fraudulently delay the entry of generic alternatives in order to control pricing.  The settlement resolves six whistleblower suits pending in New Jersey and Virginia.  Indivior previously paid $600 million to resolve federal claims, and former parent company Reckitt Benckiser previously paid $1.4 billion to resolve the same.  CA AG; FL AG; MI AG

Catch of the Week: Telemarketer Gets 10 Years in $3.3 Million Telemedicine and Genetic Testing Fraud Scheme

Posted  04/16/21
female looking through a lab telescope
Ivan Andre Scott, a 36-year-old Florida man, just landed a 10-year prison sentence for organizing a $3.3 million Medicare fraud scheme involving two of the hottest healthcare trends – telemedicine and genetic testing to assess the likelihood of future cancer. The conspiracy targeted vulnerable Medicare beneficiaries for pricey cancer screening genetic tests, prosecutors said. Claims for these tests were falsely...

Catch of the Week: Unnecessary Blood Flow Tests Led to Unnecessary Flow of Healthcare Dollars

Posted  03/19/21
Doctor in handcuffs holding a stethoscope
Healthcare fraudsters routinely look for ways to extract money from federal health programs in ways that raise the least suspicion of their actions.  One of these methods is through unnecessary diagnostic testing, which can often be lucrative when conducted routinely on large groups of patients. This week we focus on a recent settlement with Dr. Dinesh Shah and Michigan Physicians Group, P.C. (“MPG”) for $2...

March 18, 2021

A Michigan-based cardiologist, Dinesh Shah, and his practice, Michigan Physicians Group, P.C. (MPG), have agreed to pay $2 million to resolve allegations of defrauding Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE by submitting claims for medically unnecessary diagnostic testing, in violation of the False Claims Act.  In separate qui tam suits filed by former employees Arlene Klinke and Khrystyna Mala, the whistleblowers alleged that between 2006 and 2017, Shah and MPG billed government healthcare programs for Ankle Brachial Index tests, Toe Brachial Index tests, and Nuclear Stress Tests that were ordered and provided without regard to necessity.  USAO EDMI

March 16, 2021

Jack Lee Stapleton and Jack Hunter Stapleton, the former owners of a Florida-based telemarketing company known as CV McDowell LLC or J&J Tel Marketing LLC (the Stapleton Entities), have agreed to pay at least $4 million to resolve a qui tam case by a former employee alleging violations of the False Claims Act.  According to whistleblower Dwayne Thornton, the Stapletons solicited prospective patients through telemarketing calls, convinced them to accept compounded drugs regardless of need, and then procured prescriptions and sent them to compounding pharmacies that agreed to pay the Stapletons half of all TRICARE reimbursements.  USAO MDFL
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