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Financial and Investment Fraud

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to financial and investment fraud. You may also be interested in the following pages:

Page 1 of 28

April 15, 2019

Munich-based UniCredit Bank AG (UCB AG) and affiliated entities have agreed to pay more than $1.3 billion to resolve criminal charges and related allegations of unlawful conduct by the Department of Justice, Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), the Federal Reserve, the New York Department of Financial Services, and the New York County District Attorney's Office. As part of the settlement, UniCredit admitted that between 2002 and 2011 it processed financial transactions worth hundreds of millions of dollars through U.S. financial institutions on behalf of the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines and other entities subject to sanctions under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA).  DOJ; Treasury; Fed; DANY

April 9, 2019

London-based Standard Chartered Bank has agreed to pay $1.1 billion to resolve criminal charges and related allegations of unlawful conduct by the Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), the Federal Reserve, the New York Department of Financial Services, the New York County District Attorney's Office, and the United Kingdom's Financial Conduct Authority. As part of the settlement, Standard Chartered admitted that it processed thousands of financial transactions worth hundreds of millions of dollars through U.S. financial institutions for the benefit of Iranian and other entities and individuals subject to sanctions. In addition, Standard Chartered admitted that it had deficiencies in its compliance programs and had falsified the records of New York financial institutions.  In addition to the financial penalties, Standard Chartered agreed to the extension of an existing deferred prosecution agreement through 2021, and committed to undertaking specified compliance initiatives.  DOJ; Treasury; Fed; DANY; UK

April 9, 2019

Antonio Carlos de Godoy Buzaneli of Florida was sentenced to 20 years in prison for his role in a scheme that raised approximately $150 million from investors for his company Providence Holdings International, Inc., which Buzaneli represented would invest in the factoring of accounts receivable in Brazil. In fact, much of the investors’ funds were used to make Ponzi-style payments to other investors, and to make commission payments to Providence’s nationwide network of brokers. USAO Minn

SEC and DOJ Charge former Roadrunner CFO with Accounting Fraud

Posted  04/5/19
Securities Exchange Commission Logo
On April 3, the SEC and DOJ both announced charges against Peter Armbruster, former CFO of Roadrunner Transportation Systems Inc., for allegedly participating in a securities and accounting fraud scheme that lost Roadrunner shareholders over $245 million. According to Assistant Attorney General Brian Benczkowski, Armbruster and his co-conspirators “used sham accounting entries, misstated accounts, and other means to...

April 2, 2019

After being charged in 2017, Thomas Lanzana, Blackbox Pulse, LLC, Nikolay Masanko, and White Cloud Mountain, LLC have been ordered to pay more than $2.7 million in restitution and civil penalties in connection with their marketing of a foreign exchange trading scheme through which they fraudulently solicited and accepted funds from customers for the purported purpose of trading forex in a commodity pool.  In fact, defendants misappropriated customers' funds, fabricated account statements, and misrepresented trades and balances.  CFTC

April 2, 2019

Former CEO of Jumio, Daniel Mattes, will pay more than $17 million to settle SEC charges of defrauding investors in the Silicon Valley based private mobile payments company. The SEC complaint alleges that Mattes exaggerated Jumio’s 2013 and 2014 revenues while selling his personal shares to investors in the private, secondary market. When Jumio filed for bankruptcy in 2016, the shares became worthless and investors lost everything. Mattes is barred from being an officer or director of a publicly traded company in the U.S. Further, he must pay more than $16 million in disgorgement and prejudgment interest plus a $640,000 penalty. The SEC also settled separate proceedings against Jumio’s former CFO, Chad Starkey, for failing to exercise reasonable care concerning the financial statements and signing stock transfer agreements that falsely implied that the board of directors had approved Mattes’ sales. SEC

March 21, 2019

A hedge fund manager in Boston was sentenced to 14 years in prison for running a multi-million dollar Ponzi scheme from 2009 to 2017. Raymond Montoya, who ran RMA Strategic Opportunity Fund, LLC, was accused of misrepresenting the fund's rate of returns to induce millions of dollars in investments from unsuspecting victims across three states, including family, friends, and acquaintances. Montoya only invested a portion of the money – the rest was diverted to other bank accounts and used to pay personal expenses. USAO MA

March 20, 2019

Wells Fargo Securities has been ordered to pay over $800,000 in civil penalties to the SEC for failing to disclose that a video game development project being financed by a bond it underwrote still faced a significant shortfall in funding. The lead banker on the deal, Peter Cannava, was additionally accused of failing to disclose the fees being paid to the firm by startup video game company, 38 Studios. SEC

CFTC Pays Whistleblower Award for Related Action Brought by Another Federal Regulator

Posted  03/14/19
By Carolina Gonzalez
financial trading numbers
On March 4, 2019, the CFTC announced an award of $2 million to an anonymous whistleblower who was not an insider, but provided “critical information through independent analysis of market data” that lead to several million in recoveries by two regulatory agencies. Moreover, as the Order makes clear, the whistleblower’s $2 million award is based not just on the CFTC’s recovery, but also on a recovery in a...

March 12, 2019

Lumber Liquidators agreed to pay $33 million in criminal fines and forfeitures for knowingly making false and misleading statements regarding formaldehyde emissions from laminate flooring imported by the company from China.  In March, 2015, 60 Minutes reported that laminate flooring sold by Lumber Liquidators in the United States did not meet California Air Resources Board (CARB) emission standards for formaldehyde and featured undercover videos and laboratory test results.  The company filed an SEC Form 8-K broadly denying the allegations in the 60 Minutes episode and asserting that Lumber Liquidators complied with CARB regulations. The statement, however, omitted material facts known to the company. The company also entered into a deferred prosecution agreement, agreeing to implement internal control procedures and cooperate with ongoing investigations.   In a separate agreement with the SEC, Lumber Liquidators will also disgorge over $6 million in profits and prejudgment interest, which amount will be credited against the criminal penalties.  DOJ; SEC; USAO ED VA.
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