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Whistleblower Case

This archive displays posts tagged as involving a whistleblower case or claim. You may also be interested in our pages:

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New Settlement Shows the Power of Whistleblowers to Root out Fraud against Private Insurers

Posted  08/6/20
whistle hanging against a chalkboard
The nation’s biggest insurers, Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE already incentivize whistleblowers to report fraud. Because those programs are federally-funded, a whistleblower can bring suit under the False Claims Act and share in 15-30% of the recovery. The FCA is a law that allows private individuals alleging fraud against the government to bring a lawsuit in the name of the United States. The law leads to about...

Catch of the Week: Indivior Agrees to Pay $600 Million to Settle Opioid Fraud Case

Posted  07/31/20
pill container spilled over with pills in the form of a dollar sign
The latest in our Catch of the Week series features Indivior Solutions’ (“Indivior”) agreement to pay $600 million to resolve criminal and civil liability associated with the marketing of the opioid-addiction-treatment drug Suboxone. This is in addition to the $1.4 billion resolution with Indivior’s former parent, Reckitt Benckiser Group PLC (“RB Group”) that was previously announced in 2019. Suboxone is a...

July 30, 2020

Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), now known as DXC Technology, and New York City have agreed to pay approximately $2.8 million to resolve allegations of violating the federal and New York State False Claims Acts in connection with New York City’s Early Intervention Program (EIP), which provides speech and physical therapy services for infants and toddlers with possible developmental disabilities.  According to a qui tam lawsuit, while retained by the City to process and submit its EIP claims to various insurers, CSC allegedly received permission from the City to categorize claims submitted to private insurers as “denied” if no response was received within 90 days.  CSC then resubmitted those claims to Medicaid using an improper code, causing Medicaid to make payments it would not have otherwise.  For revealing the misconduct, the unnamed whistleblower in this case will receive $416,250.  AG NY; USAO SDNY

July 28, 2020

A pharmaceutical company accused of paying illegal inducements to physicians has agreed to pay $3.5 million to resolve allegations of violating the False Claims Act.  In order to induce physicians to prescribe its newly-launched local analgesic, EXPAREL, Pacira Pharmaceuticals Inc. allegedly paid doctors kickbacks that were half-heartedly disguised as grant money for research.  In order to receive the so-called research grant, Pacira required EXPAREL to be placed on formulary at the physician’s institution, but did not document why such research was needed or follow up on research results.  The fraud was eventually exposed by a pharmacist in a qui tam suit; the pharmacist will receive $638,000 as part of the settlement.  USAO NJ; AG FL

July 24, 2020

Several divisions of pharmaceutical company Indivior, which marketed of the opioid-addiction drug Suboxone, pleaded guilty to felony healthcare fraud, entered into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement, and will pay a total of $600 million in criminal fines, restitution, civil damages, and penalties.  In six separate cases brought by whistleblowers, Indivior was also alleged to have caused false claims to be submitted to government healthcare programs including by promoting the sale of Suboxone to physicians who were prescribing it outside of medically accepted indication, misrepresenting the likelihood of Suboxone being diverted, and taking steps to delay generic competition for Suboxone. Indivior admitted making false statements about the safety of the film version of Suboxone in order to promote its sale.  In addition, the FTC claimed that violated antitrust laws through a deceptive scheme to thwart lower priced generic competition with Suboxone.  The total settlement consists of criminal restitution of $289 million; a civil settlement of $300 million, with $209.3 million paid to resolve claims by the federal government and $90.7 million to participating states; and, $10 million in penalties to the Federal Trade Commission.  The settlement also requires Indivior to take steps including the dissolution of its Suboxone sales force. Indivior was until 2014 a subsidiary of Reckitt Benckiser Group PLC, which previously paid $1.4 billion to resolve claims related to Suboxone marketing.  DOJ; USAO NJ; FTC

Constantine Cannon Client Slams the Brakes on Customs Fraud in $8 Million Settlement Against Auto Parts Distributor Centric Parts

Posted  07/24/20
Line of automobiles
Steve Hughes, a whistleblower represented by Constantine Cannon, slammed the brakes on a long-running scheme by his former employer to evade customs duties, resulting in an $8 million settlement of the whistleblower’s False Claims Act lawsuit against CWD, LLC. The Carson, CA-based company, which does business as Centric Parts, is one of the largest aftermarket brake and chassis parts distributors in North America....

Newly Unsealed Whistleblower Lawsuit Alleges Drug Giant McKesson Gave Doctors Illegal Kickbacks in the Form of Free Software

Posted  07/24/20
Close-up of McKesson logo on computer screen
Constantine Cannon LLP is pleased to announce the unsealing of a whistleblower lawsuit its client brought alleging that drug wholesaler McKesson Corp. and its affiliated companies provided illegal kickbacks in the form of free business services to encourage oncologists and other doctors to buy drugs from McKesson. The lawsuit alleges that McKesson gave doctors valuable business-management tools geared towards...

July 23, 2020

Progenity, Inc., f/k/a Ascendant MDx, Inc., has agreed to pay a total of $49 million to resolve allegations that the California-based clinical laboratory submitted false claims to Medicaid, the VA, TRICARE, and the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) through different fraudulent schemes.  First, from 2012 to 2016, Progenity allegedly billed the programs for non-reimbursable prenatal tests using a reimbursable billing code.  Second, in claims originally brought by a whistleblower under the False Claims Act, the company was alleged to violate the Anti-Kickback Statue by providing improper incentives to physicians—including paying above fair market value for blood specimen “draw fees”, providing tens of thousands of dollars in free food and alcohol, and routinely reducing or waiving co-insurance or deductibles—in order to induce physicians to order their tests.  Approximately $35.9 million of the settlement proceeds will go toward resolving federal claims, with the remaining $13.1 million paid to different states.  AG NC; USAO SDCA; USAO SDNY

July 22, 2020

Auto parts distributor CWD Holdings LLC, which does business as Centric Parts, will pay $8 million to resolve claims in False Claims Act cases brought by two whistleblowers, Steven Hughes and Jeffrey Hawk.  The government alleged that over the course of ten years the defendant imported brake pads, falsely identifying them as unmounted brake pads, which are not subject to any tariff, when they were, in fact, mounted brake pads, which are subject to a 2.5% tariff.  Defendant thereby knowingly evaded millions of dollars in customs duties.  The whistleblowers will share a $1.48 million whistleblower award.  USAO ED MI; USAO CD CA
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