Have a Claim?

Click here for a confidential contact or call:

1-212-350-2764

Whistleblower Rewards

This archive displays posts tagged as including whistleblower rewards. You may also be interested in the following pages:

Page 1 of 60

June 20, 2019

Pennsylvania-based Support of Microcomputers Associates (SOMA) has agreed to a $300,000 judgment for violating the False Claims Act and Trade Agreements Act.  The Trade Agreements Act prohibits the sale of computer supplies manufactured in certain countries to some federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense.  However, according to a former SOMA executive’s lawsuit, the company allegedly sold federal agencies computer supplies made in China, Vietnam, and other non-compliant countries.  USAO EDPA

June 20, 2019

Hart to Heart Ambulance Services, d/b/a Hart to Heart Transportation Services, has agreed to pay $1.25 million to settle allegations that it defrauded Medicare by submitting claims for medically unnecessary services, violating the False Claims Act.  Allegations were first brought to the government’s attention by former employee, Bryan Arvey, who alleged that from 2010 to 2017, Hart to Heart management pressured employees to falsify claims for non-emergency ambulance transports, such as hospital discharges.  For aiding in the recovery of public funds, Arvey will receive a share of $251,000.  USAO MD

CALLING ALL FCPA WHISTLEBLOWERS — THE CFTC WANTS YOU!

Posted  06/19/19
Businessmen Holding Foreign Currency in an Envelope
If you have information on Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) violations in the commodities or derivatives markets, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) wants to hear from you. The agency made this clear in a recently-issued CFTC "Whistleblower Alert" calling on all FCPA whistleblowers to step forward and report what they know. The agency even dangled the potential for monetary rewards for those...

Blowing the Whistle on Data Breaches and Cybersecurity Flaws

Posted  06/14/19
Computer Security Profession Sitting at Her Computer Desk
With increasing dependence on technology, cybersecurity has emerged as a critical issue for customers, investors, and government regulators. Data breaches and other cybersecurity incidents can have devastating effects. In 2018, the Council of Economic Advisers estimated that malicious cyber activity cost the U.S. economy up to $109 billion dollars in 2016 alone. Typically, the public only learns of such flaws and...

Qui Tam Lawsuits: Reporting Fraud Under the False Claims Act

Posted  06/14/19
Qui Tam Lawyers

What potential whistleblowers need to know about reporting fraud under the False Claims Act

Using the False Claims Act (FCA), a whistleblower can bring a lawsuit on behalf of the United States to recover damages from parties who are cheating the government out of taxpayer funds.  Also called qui tam actions, these lawsuits allow eligible whistleblowers, referred to as “relators,” to claim a percentage of any...

June 11, 2019

A Maryland-based medical device manufacturer facing criminal charges and civil charges under the False Claims Act has agreed to pay $15 million to settle all claims.  According to former employee and whistleblower John Murtaugh, when the company discovered that its MicroMatrix wound dressing powder was contaminated with high levels of endotoxins, it allegedly removed certain MicroMatrix products off the market, but failed to report the removal to the FDA and disclose the reason to doctors, hospitals, and its own sales representatives.  ACell also allegedly caused false claims to be submitted to federal healthcare programs by directing its sales representatives to market the product as safe and effective, providing coding recommendations designed to elicit higher payments from Medicare, and providing improper inducements to encourage use of its product.  As part of the settlement, Murtaugh will receive $2.3 million, and ACell will enter into a 5-year corporate integrity agreement.  DOJ

Question of the Week — Should the Medicare Fraud Hotline or HHS OIG Reward Informants?

Posted  06/7/19
businessmen showing inside of briefcase
Opioid manufacturer Insys Therapeutics agreed to a $225 million settlement related to allegations that it unlawfully marketed its drug Subsys and paid kickbacks to providers through “speaker programs” that rewarded providers who prescribed Subsys. We previously asked whether our readers thought CEOs should be more liable for corporate wrongdoing after the Insys CEO was convicted for participating in a criminal...

June 5, 2019

Opioid manufacturer Insys Therapeutics will pay $225 million to resolve federal criminal and civil claims against it regarding the unlawful marketing of its drug Subsys, including the payment of kickbacks to providers through sham "speaker programs" that rewarded practitioners who increased their Subsys prescribing, as well as jobs for prescribers' relatives and friends, and lavish meals and entertainment.  $195 million of the settlement will be paid to resolve False Claim Act allegations in five separate whistleblower lawsuits in which the government intervened in 2018; the whistleblower reward shares have not yet been determined.  To resolve the criminal claims, Insys will pay $2 million and forfeit $28 million; its operating subsidiary will plead guilty to wire fraud and related charges.  In addition, Insys entered into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement and a five-year deferred prosecution agreement. Previously, five former Insys executives were convicted of racketeering in connection with Subsys marketing.  DOJ; USAO Mass

June 3, 2019

Rialto Capital Management LLC (Rialto) and its former affiliate, RL BB-IN KRE LLC (RL BB), have agreed to pay $3.6 million to resolve allegations that a RL BB hospital violated the Anti-Kickback Statute, the Stark Law, and the False Claims Act.  A qui tam lawsuit filed by Dr. Abdul Buridi had revealed that Indiana-based Kentuckiana Medical Center, under Rialto’s direction, had provided personal loans to two referring doctors and then failed to collect on those loans after they became due in full.  Of the $3.6 million recovered, Dr. Buridi will receive $612,000.  DOJ

June 3, 2019

The SEC made a $3 million whistleblower award to be shared by multiple anonymous whistleblowers who jointly submitted a tip to the SEC Whistleblower Program regarding their employer.  The tip, reporting an alleged securities law violation that impacted retail investors, led to a successful enforcement action by the SEC.  The SEC also noted that the whistleblowers had undertaken significant efforts to report the issues internally and seek to have them corrected.  SEC
1 2 3 60

Newsletter

Subscribe to receive email updates from the Constantine Cannon blogs

Sign up for: