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Government Procurement Fraud

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud in government contracting and procurement. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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For Garlic Powder They Got Maltodextrin

Posted  08/28/20
By Jessica T. Moore
The centuries-old yet enduring fraud of cheap-substitutions for quality foodstuffs reared its head during the U.S. Civil War when the government bought supplies from contractors: “For sugar, it often got sand; for coffee, rye; for leather, something no better than brown paper; for sound horses and mules, spavined beasts and dying donkeys; and for serviceable muskets and pistols, the experimental failures of sanguine...

July 20, 2020

Defense contractor iNovex Information Systems, Inc., will pay $1 million to resolve claims that it violated the FCA by overcharging the National Security Agency.  Defendant allegedly invoiced the NSA for services it claimed were provided by personnel who met contractually specified training and qualification requirements when, in fact, it knew that those employees did not meet all of the specialized qualifications.  USAO MD

COVID-19 Frauds of the Week: Fake Employees and Fake Treatments

Posted  07/17/20
handcuffs on a gavel with money scattered around
Taxpayers, rightfully upset about large companies such as Shake Shack and Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse claiming large sums of Paycheck Protection Program money from the Small Business Administration, should consider shifting some of their ire to applicants posing as the original intended recipients—small businesses—who are getting in on the grift. And for fraudsters who prefer to market unproven products rather than...

The Border Wall Falls Down

Posted  07/15/20
By Sarah “Poppy” Alexander
a tall border wall in the middle of the dessert
In 2018, Constantine Cannon’s Mary Inman warned President Trump away from his pet border wall project as a surefire target for fraudsters.  Two years later, here we are. Trump’s announced plan to build a wall along the 1,954 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico was a key campaign promise.  That plan has now devolved into a series of piecemeal incomplete sections, including some that are privately funded....

This Week in Whistleblower History: House Resolution on July 8, 1861 Led to the Original False Claims Act

Posted  07/10/20
By Edward Baker
Photo of Winder Building in Washington DC
This week marks an important event in whistleblower history.  On July 8, 1861, Congressman Charles H. Van Wyck of New York submitted a resolution to the U.S. House of Representatives to create a special committee of five members appointed by the Speaker of the House to investigate fraud and profiteering in military contracts during the Civil War.  The committee’s investigations ultimately led to the enactment of...

June 22, 2020

A former employee of Schneider Electric Buildings America, Bhaskar Patel, has been sentenced to three years of probation and ordered to forfeit over $2.5 million in connection with a five-year bribery scheme involving several federal energy savings performance contracts.  Patel had pleaded guilty to soliciting and receiving over $2.5 million in bribes from eight Schneider subcontractors on the contracts, which included a $24.7 million project for the USDA in California, two projects amounting to $34.4 million for the GSA in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, a $42.4 million project for the VA in the Northeast, a $70 million project for the Coast Guard in Puerto Rico, and a $114.3 million project for the Navy in California.  USAO VT

Catch of the Week: Tacoma foundry pays 10.8M settlement over deficient steel parts destined for U.S. Navy submarines, falsified tests

Posted  06/18/20
US-Navy-ships-in-the-middle-of-the-ocean
The latest in our Catch of the Week series features Bradken Inc.’s $10.8 million payment to resolve allegations that its Tacoma foundry violated the False Claims Act (“FCA”) when it produced and sold substandard steel parts for U.S. Navy submarines and falsified test results to hide the failures. Bradken and its former lab director Elaine Thomas also face criminal charges. The company accepted responsibility and...

June 16, 2020

The U.S. Navy’s leading supplier of high-yield steel for submarines, Bradken Inc., has agreed to pay $10.8 million and comply with a three-year deferred prosecution agreement in order to settle allegations it violated the False Claims Act through its Tacoma foundry producing and selling steel that failed to meet certain strength standards required by the Navy.  In 2017, the defense contractor discovered and self-disclosed that test results for a substantial portion of its steel productions, spanning thirty years, had been improperly altered by then director of metallurgy, Elaine Thomas, causing shipbuilders to submit false claims to the Navy.  DOJ; USAO WDWA

June 12, 2020

A major Virginia-based defense contractor, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), has paid $5.98 million to settle claims arising from a self-disclosure that it violated the False Claims Act on a contract to provide IT support to the U.S. Army.  According to SAIC, employees working on newer projects that were not yet funded had billed their time to older projects that were funded.  When funding became available on the newer projects, employees working on the older projects then billed their time to the newer project.  USAO SDCA

June 10, 2020

Alutiiq International Solutions LLC (AIS), an Alaskan Native Corporation and government contractor, has agreed to pay $1.25 million and enter into a non-prosecution agreement to settle allegations of violating the Anti-Kickback Act in connection with a multi-million dollar General Services Administration (GSA) contract to modernize the Harry S. Truman Federal Building in Washington, D.C.  Beginning in 2010, a project manager formerly employed by AIS allegedly accepted kickbacks from a subcontractor in exchange for steering more work to the subcontractor, while also fraudulently billing GSA for a non-existent on-site supervisor and overinflating costs from its subcontractor.  AIS and its parent company, Afognak Native Corporation, cooperated fully with the investigation and have since engaged in extensive remedial actions.  DOJ
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