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Government Procurement Fraud

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to fraud in government contracting and procurement. You may also be interested in the following pages:

Page 1 of 19

April 23, 2019

Oregon-based aluminum supplier Hydro Extrusion Portland, Inc., formerly known as Sapa Profiles Inc., together with its parent company, has agreed to pay $47 million to settle criminal mail fraud charges and civil claims alleging that between 1996 and 2015, the company altered the results of tensile tests measuring the consistency and reliability of extruded aluminum, and falsified certifications about products meeting testing requirements and contract specifications. Among the customers who received products that defendants knew did not meet contract specifications were NASA and the Dept. of Defense Missile Defense Agency.  The $47 million total settlement payment consists of forfeiture of $1.8 million, $34.1 million in criminal restitution to NASA, DOD, and commercial customers – $23.6 million of which is also credited to resolve civil claims under the False Claims Act – and an additional $11 million in payments to resolve civil FCA claims.  Defendant entered into a deferred prosecution agreement and has been  suspended as a U.S. government contractor.  DOJ; USAO EDVA

Hyundai Oilbank Co., S-Oil Corporation, et al — Government Contract Fraud/Bid-Rigging ($363 million)

A team of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of an anonymous whistleblower who provided extensive assistance to the U.S. government in its criminal and civil cases against several Korean oil and transportation companies, for their roles in a conspiracy to artificially inflate prices on fuel contracts for U.S. military bases in South Korea. In November 2018, SK Energy Co. Ltd., GS Caltex Corporation, and Hanjin Transportation Co. Ltd. collectively agreed to pay $154 million, to resolve the False Claims Act allegations brought by Constantine Cannon’s client, and an additional $82 million in criminal fines for their involvement in the conspiracy the whistleblower exposed. And in March 2019, the Department of Justice announced that two additional companies, Hyundai Oilbank Co. Ltd and S-Oil Corporation, would pay $75 million in criminal fines and $52 million to resolve these same False Claims Act and antitrust violations. This brings the settlement totals to $363 million and is the largest False Claims Act antitrust recovery as well as the largest False Claims Act settlement involving bid-rigging to date. Read more here.

March 20, 2019

South Korean companies Hyundai Oilbank Co. Ltd. and S-Oil Corporation will plead guilty and pay $127 million in fines to resolve criminal and civil claims arising from the defendants’ alleged bid-rigging and price-fixing in contracts to supply fuel to U.S. military bases in South Korea.  The settlement, the second announced by DOJ in an ongoing investigation, resolves criminal conspiracy and antitrust claims, as well as civil antitrust and False Claims Act violations related to the bid-rigging conspiracy. DOJ

March 5, 2019

The United States reached a $25 million settlement against an Afghan delivery and transport subcontractor accused of violating the False Claims Act. From 2010 to 2012, Hikmat Shadman Logistics Services Company (HSLSC) and its owner, Hikmatullah Shadman, allegedly overcharged the United States millions of dollars by inflating their rates to well above those of competitors, falsifying thousands of documents, and charging for work that was never performed. In addition to the civil charges, HSLSC faced criminal charges for paying bribes to at least two U.S. service members to influence the awarding of contracts. As part of the criminal settlement, the company and its officers have agreed to seek no further business with the United States and to refrain from applying for travel visas to the United States. DOJ; USAO DC

February 22, 2019

Mark Cundiff of Macon, Georgia, was sentenced to three years in prison and ordered to pay restitution of $380,000 to the federal government.  Cundiff, a former DOD employee at Robins Air Force Base, was responsible for soliciting bids for new contracts at the base.  Cundiff accepted cash payments of $2,000-$8,00 monthly over the course of almost ten years from co-defendant Raymond Williams (previously sentenced to five years in prison) in exchange for drafting bid solicitation Performance Work Statements in such a way that the contracts could only be met by Williams and his companies, US Technology Corporation and US Technology Aerospace Engineering Corporation.  The UST companies and Williams received almost $14.5 million in government contracts as a result of the bribery scheme.  USAO MD GA

February 21, 2019

Body armor manufacturer Survival Armor, Inc., will pay $900,000 to resolve claims that it falsely claimed to qualify as a small business to secure a five-year small business set-aside contract to provide tactical body armor to the Department of Homeland Security.  The company is, in fact, a subsidiary of a large foreign parent company, and not a small business.  USAO MD FL

February 20, 2019

Clifton Burch and Peter McKean have been found guilty by a jury for conspiring to submit fraudulently rigged bids for construction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which is paid for and overseen by the Department of Energy.  Burch and McKean agreed to and did submit bids that were not genuine, but were intended to be higher than a $5.7 million bid submitted to the DOE by a “developer” who would then pay them.  The "developer" was, in fact, an undercover agent.  USAO ND Cal

February 15, 2019

James King of Baltimore, Maryland, a former official with the Department of Veterans Affairs, was sentenced to 11 years in prison following his guilty plea for soliciting and receiving bribes from three for-profit schools that enrolled disabled military veterans.  The VA paid over $2 million to the schools that paid the bribes through its Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program.  DOJ

WATCH THIS SPACE: DOJ and DOE Call Out Lockheed Martin for Self-Dealing at Hanford Plutonium Site

Posted  02/15/19
By Jessica T. Moore
Worker in HazMat suit standing in front of pile of barrels in rain
The nation’s largest toxic cleanup site has suffered another setback, this time not in the cleanup itself but in alleged self-dealing, corruption, kickbacks, and lies, costing taxpayers over $60M, according to a complaint filed by DOJ against Mission Support Alliance, Lockheed Martin Services (and a subsidiary), and Jorge Francisco Armijo. The Hanford Nuclear Site in central Washington state made plutonium for...

January 28, 2019

Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation (NGSC) will pay $5.2 million to resolve allegations of False Claims Act liability for fraudulently billing labor under a contract with the United States Postal Service. NGSC, a provider of information and technology services, entered into an Enterprise Technology Services Contract with USPS, and allegedly billed work by personnel who lacked the experience and the education required under the contract. DOJ
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