Contact

Click here for a confidential contact or call:

1-212-350-2774

Multiple Whistleblowers and First-to-File

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to multiple whistleblowers and first-to-file issues in whistleblower litigation. You may also be interested in our pages:

Page 3 of 4

Chemed to Pay $75 Million to Settle False Claims Lawsuit

Posted  10/31/17
By the C|C Whistleblower Lawyer Team Chemed, and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Vitas, have agreed to pay $75 million to resolve a government lawsuit brought under the False Claims Act (FCA). According to the DOJ’s press release, the settlement resolves allegations that between 2002 and 2013 Vitas submitted false claims to Medicare for services to hospice patients who were not terminally ill. The government’s...

July 17, 2017

Ohio-based nursing home operators Foundations Health Solutions Inc., Olympia Therapy Inc. and Tridia Hospice Care Inc., and their executives Brian Colleran and Daniel Parker, agreed to pay roughly $19.5 million to resolve allegations they violated the False Claims Act by submitting to Medicare claims for medically unnecessary rehabilitation therapy services and for hospice services to patients not eligible for the Medicare benefit, and by soliciting and receiving kickbacks to refer patients from their skilled nursing facilities to home health care provider Amber Home Care LLC.  The allegations originated in two whistleblower lawsuits filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act by former Olympia employee Vladimir Trakhter and former Tridia employees Paula Bourne and La’Tasha Goodwin.  Mr. Trahkter will receive a whistleblower award of roughly $2.9 million and Ms. Bourne and Ms. Goodwin collectively will receive an award of roughly $740,000, all from the proceeds of the government’s recovery.  Whistleblower Insider

January 11, 2017

Ireland-based Shire Pharmaceuticals LLC and certain subsidiaries agreed to pay $350 million to settle charges that Shire and the company it acquired in 2011, Advanced BioHealing violated the False Claims Act and Anti-Kickback Statute by using kickbacks and other unlawful methods to induce clinics and physicians to use or overuse their “Dermagraft” skin product. It is the largest False Claims Act recovery in a kickback case involving a medical device, and resolves claims brought by the federal government along with 37 states and the District of Columbia. The States will receive $6,104,000 for the State share of the Medicaid program. According to the government, Dermagraft salespersons unlawfully induced clinics and physicians with lavish dinners, drinks, entertainment and travel; medical equipment and supplies; unwarranted payments for purported speaking engagements and bogus case studies; and cash, credits and rebates. The allegations originated in six lawsuits filed brought by whistleblowers in, or transferred to, the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida. Two of the qui tam actions named New York and other states and included allegations that Shire submitted or caused to be submitted false claims to the Medicaid program under federal and state False Claims Acts. The whistleblowers will receive a yet-to-be-determined whistleblower award from the proceeds of the government recovery. Whistleblower Insider, NY, FL

July 27, 2016

Connecticut psychiatrist Dr. Anton Fry and his company CPC Associates agreed to pay $36,704 to resolve allegations they violated the False Claims Act by submitting improper claims to Medicare for psychiatric services that were provided over the phone instead of by meeting with the beneficiaries in the office and treating them in person.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act by Jodi Cohen, a former patient of Dr. Fry, and Medical Bill Consultants, LLC, a billing company.  They will receive a whistleblower award of $6,239 from the proceeds of the government's recovery.  DOJ (DCT)

April 27, 2016

Pharmaceutical giants Wyeth and Pfizer, Inc. agreed to pay $784.6 million to resolve allegations that Wyeth violated the False Claims Act by reporting to the government false prices on two of its proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drugs, Protonix Oral and Protonix IV.  Under the state Medicaid programs, drug companies must provide Medicaid rebates based on the best prices they offer other customers.  According to the government, Wyeth hid from Medicaid bundled discounts it provided to thousands of hospitals across the country on Protonix Oral and Protonix IV.  By failing to report these bundled discounts, Wyeth allegedly avoided paying hundreds of millions of dollars in rebates.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act by Lauren Kieff, a former hospital sales representative for AstraZeneca and William St. John LaCorte, a physician practicing in New Orleans.  They will collectively receive a whistleblower award of roughly $98 million from the proceeds of the federal and state settlements.  Whistleblower Insider

April 27, 2016

Michigan and 34 other states reached an agreement in principle to settle allegations against Wyeth, a subsidiary of Pfizer, Inc. The settlement will resolve allegations that Wyeth knowingly underpaid rebates owed under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program for the sales, Protonix Oral and Protonix IV between 2001 and 2006. Both are drugs that are used to treat conditions such as acid reflux. Under the settlement Wyeth agreed to pay $784.6 million to the United States and the States. Over $371 million of this amount will go to the Medicaid Program. The settlement stems from two whistleblower lawsuits which were filed in the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts. The United States, 35 states (including Michigan) and the District of Columbia intervened in the lawsuits. NY, NJ, MI, WA

$2 Million SEC Whistleblower Award To Be Split Among Three Whistleblowers — But The First To The Commission Gets The Most

Posted  03/10/16
The SEC has announced that its most recent whistleblower award, of almost $2 million, will be split among three whistleblowers — but not evenly.  The first whistleblower, identified only as “Claimant 1,” will receive about $1.8 million.  The other two whistleblowers will share about $130,000. The SEC whistleblower program was inspired by, and roughly based on, The False Claims Act (FCA), oft-described...

October 7, 2015

Kentucky-based nursing home pharmacy PharMerica Corp. agreed to pay $9.25 million to resolve allegations it violated the False Claims Act by soliciting and receiving kickbacks from pharmaceutical manufacturer Abbott Laboratories in exchange for promoting the anti-epileptic prescription drug Depakote for nursing home patients.  The settlement is part of the continuing fallout of the $1.5 billion settlement Abbott entered into with the government in May 2012 to resolve Abbott’s liability under the False Claims Act for alleged kickbacks to nursing home pharmacies, including PharMerica.  The settlement partially resolves allegations raised in two whistleblower lawsuits brought by former Abbott employees Richard Spetter and Meredith McCoyd under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  Ms. McCoyd will receive a whistleblower award of $1 million from the federal share of the settlement amount. Whistleblower Insider

September 21, 2015

Non-profit healthcare organization Adventist Health System agreed to pay $115 million to settle allegations it violated the False Claims Act by maintaining improper compensation arrangements with referring physicians and by miscoding claims.  The allegations originated in two whistleblower lawsuits filed by former Adventist hospital employees Michael Payne, Melissa Church and Gloria Pryor under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  The will receive a yet-to-be-determined whistleblower award from the government’s recovery. DOJ

June 24, 2015

For-profit education company Education Affiliates agreed to pay $13 million to settle charges it violated the False Claims Act by submitting false claims to the Department of Education for federal student aid.  The Maryland-based company operates 50 campuses under various trade names, including All State Career, Fortis Institute, Fortis College, Tri-State Business Institute Inc., Technical Career Institute Inc., Capps College Inc., Driveco CDL Learning Center, Denver School of Nursing and Saint Paul’s School of Nursing.  According to the government, the company engaged in a variety of fraudulent acts to increase admissions including admitting unqualified students, creating false high school diplomas, falsifying students’ federal aid applications, and referring prospective students to “diploma mills” to obtain invalid online high school diplomas.  The allegations first arose in five whistleblower lawsuits filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  As part of this resolution, the five whistleblowers will receive whistleblower award payments totaling approximately $1.8 million.  Whistleblower Insider

Newsletter

Subscribe to receive email updates from the Constantine Cannon blogs

Sign up for: