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Certifications

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to certifications as a basis for liability in whistleblower litigation. You may also be interested in our pages:

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June 16, 2020

The U.S. Navy’s leading supplier of high-yield steel for submarines, Bradken Inc., has agreed to pay $10.8 million and comply with a three-year deferred prosecution agreement in order to settle allegations it violated the False Claims Act through its Tacoma foundry producing and selling steel that failed to meet certain strength standards required by the Navy.  In 2017, the defense contractor discovered and self-disclosed that test results for a substantial portion of its steel productions, spanning thirty years, had been improperly altered by then director of metallurgy, Elaine Thomas, causing shipbuilders to submit false claims to the Navy.  DOJ; USAO WDWA

May 22, 2020

The University of San Francisco has agreed to pay $2.5 million to resolve allegations of knowingly presenting false and fraudulent claims in order to obtain federal grants under the AmeriCorps State and National Program to support its San Francisco Teacher Residency Program, which supplements tuition and living expenses for teacher apprentices working within the local school district.  The government’s investigation, triggered by a whistleblower’s qui tam complaint, revealed that over 1,500 timesheets had been falsified and 61 awards had been falsely certified between 2014-2016, netting the university’s program and students over $1.7 million in grants.  USAO CDCA

April 21, 2020

KPMD, Inc., technology company in California, has been ordered to pay $1.7 million in restitution for defrauding Medicare and Medicaid.  According to the DOJ’s press release, KPMD entered into a contract with Ohio-based Southwest Regional Medical Center in 2011 where it agreed to implement an electronic health records software program for the hospital in exchange for government incentive payments under the federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH Act).  After KPMD’s CEO purchased the hospital, however, the company falsely attested to meeting criteria for the incentive payments even though the hospital was winding down operations.  $1.3 million of the settlement will go to Medicare, with the remaining $800,000 to go to Medicaid.  USAO SDOH

April 15, 2020

Rice University in Texas has agreed to pay more than $3.7 million to settle claims of improperly charging unrelated expenses to National Science Foundation (NSF) research and development awards, in violation of the False Claims Act.  From 2006 to 2018, Rice University allegedly falsely certified that they were complying with NSF award terms and conditions, when in fact they were knowingly and improperly charging graduate students’ teaching stipends and unrelated administrative charges to the grants.  USAO SDTX

February 6, 2020

February 6, 2020 -- The successor to the Community Redevelopment Agency of the City of Los Angeles, CRA/LA, has agreed to pay $3.1 million to resolve allegations under the False Claims Act that the agency failed to comply with federal accessibility laws while distributing federal funds to help develop affordable housing.  Federal accessibility laws require that 5% of all units in certain federally-funded housing be accessible to people with mobility issues, and an additional 2% of all units be accessible for people with visual or auditory impairments.  However, according to whistleblower and wheelchair user Mei Ling, at least nine agency-affiliated properties lacked accessible parking spaces, appropriate ramp and height access for wheelchair users, or appropriate visual and tactile signs for people with visual or auditory impairments.  DOJ; USAO CDCA

January 27, 2020

Florida Academy, a for-profit trade school, has agreed to pay $512,500 to the United States for making false certifications to the Department of Veterans Affairs (the VA) regarding its compliance with a Post-9/11 GI Bill program requirement called the 85%-15% Rule.  To ensure the VA is paying tuition rates at fair market value, the 85%-15% Rule requires participating schools to certify that at least 15% of their students are paying with private funds.   USAO MDFL

January 6, 2020

NASA contractor United Paradyne Corporation has agreed to pay $375,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by a former employee, Steven Walker, which alleged the company violated the False Claims Act by submitting claims for work it failed to perform.  According to the settlement agreement, United Paradyne had agreed to fabricate ground support equipment to NASA's Space Launch System (SLS), but failed to maintain certain cleanliness standards and falsely certified to having conformed to NASA's contractual requirements.  For his role exposing the fraud, Walker will receive $75,000.  USAO MDFL

December 30, 2019

A defense contractor accused of submitting false claims on a contract with the U.S. Army has agreed to pay $3 million to resolve its liability.  Kansas-based LaForge & Budd Construction Company, Inc., had been tasked with raising the elevation of a dam at the Fort Sill Army Post in Oklahoma.  Although the contract specified that satisfactory fill be used, LaForge defied this by using materials such as pieces of concrete, rebar, and rubble, and then represented to the Army that it had fully complied with the contract's terms and conditions.  USAO WDOK

Unitrans International Inc., Anham FZCO, et al. — Government Contract Fraud ($45 million)

Our attorneys represented Rory Maxwell, John Bush, and Supreme Foodservice GmbH in a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against Unitrans International Inc., a privately held Virginia defense contracting company, and Anham FZCO, an associated Dubai Free Zone company, for making false certifications of compliance with the U.S. sanctions regime against Iran to induce the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency and the U.S. Army to award Anham wartime contracts to provide food and transportation to U.S. troops.  Our whistleblower clients also alleged Anham knowingly and falsely represented construction progress on its Bagram warehouse in related bid proposals to the government.  In December 2019, Unitrans agreed to pay $45 million to resolve criminal and civil allegations related to this alleged misconduct, which includes $27 million to resolve our whistleblower clients’ False Claims Act allegations.  Read more about the case at the Department of Justice website here and in The Washington Post here.

December 4, 2019

A subcontractor providing logistical services on a U.S. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) contract with Anham FZCO has agreed to pay $45 million to resolve criminal obstruction charges and civil False Claims Act allegations.  Anham and Unitrans International Inc. had been accused of failing to comply with contract provisions prohibiting materials used to support U.S. troops in Afghanistan from passing through Iran.  Based on a qui tam suit by whistleblowers Rory Maxwell, John Bush, and Supreme Foodservice GmbH, the two contractors also fraudulently induced contracts with DLA and the Army by falsely certifying compliance with the Iran sanctions and falsely representing the status of another project.  DOJ
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