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FIRREA

This archive displays posts tagged as relevant to FIRREA, or the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act. You may also be interested in the following pages:

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Catch of the Week — General Electric to Pay $1.5 Billion under FIRREA in Subprime Loan Scheme

Posted  04/12/19
general electric company logo on building
The Department of Justice today announced that General Electric will pay a civil penalty of $1.5 billion under the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) to resolve claims of fraud involving the marketing of subprime residential mortgage loans.  The loans at issue originated by a GE subsidiary, WMC Mortgage.  The government alleged that WMC, GE, and their affiliates allegedly...

Top Ten Federal Financial Fraud Recoveries of 2018

Posted  01/25/19
Wooden gavel and handcuffs on top of U.S. currency
While 2018 has been a banner year for FCPA, Tax, and SEC & CFTC recoveries, in the bottomless pit of financial frauds that hurt taxpayers, the government, consumers, investors, and the American economy, 2018 brought us additional stunning recoveries for violations related to residential-mortgage backed securities, international economic sanctions, consumer protection, anti-money-laundering, EB-5 investment fraud, and...

November 8, 2018

The United States has brought charges against UBS AG and several of its affiliates, alleging that UBS defrauded investors in connection with its sale of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) in 2006 and 2007.  The complaint accuses UBS of affirmatively misleading investors and withholding crucial information from them about the quality of billions of dollars in subprime and Alt-A mortgage loans backing 40 RMBS deals. USAO EDNY; DOJ

October 9, 2018

HSBC will pay a $765 million civil penalty under the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act (FIRREA) to settle claims that it misrepresented the quality of assets in residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) that HSBC packaged and sold to investors between 2005 and 2007.  HSBC was also alleged to have misrepresented the due diligence procedures it followed in reviewing loans for securitization, claiming to follow more stringent procedures than it actually did follow.  USAO Colorado.

Catch of the Week: RBS Agrees to Pay $4.9 Billion

Posted  08/17/18
This week’s Department of Justice “Catch of the Week” goes to The Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc (RBS), who agreed to pay $4.9 billion to settle claims that RBS misled investors in the underwriting and issuing of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) between 2005 and 2008.   See DOJ Press Release. The settlement’s statement of facts details how RBS routinely made misrepresentations and omissions...

August 14, 2018

In the largest civil penalty imposed by the Justice Department for FIRREA violations leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, the Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc (RBS) will pay $4.9 billion to resolve claims that it knowingly misled investors of its residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS), including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. According to a statement of facts included with settlement details, RBS knew from its own reviews that its loans carried a high risk of default but failed to disclose that to investors. Furthermore, it allowed its due diligence process to become a total sham by not requiring that loan originators correct errors, instructing due diligence vendors to waive defects, and self-imposing caps on the number of faulty loans it removed from a RMBS. DOJ; USAO MA

August 2, 2018

Aurora Loan Services, LLC, a subsidiary of Lehman Brothers Holdings, Inc., has agreed to pay a civil penalty of $41 million to settle allegations of FIRREA violations in the loans it sold between 2004 and 2008. The mortgage originator gave preferential treatment to five "Platinum" lenders by allowing them to underwrite their own loans and freeing them from quality control standards that were imposed on other lenders. The resulting decline in loan quality was linked to a higher rate of default, hurting investors who bought residential-based mortgage securities from Lehman Brothers. USAO CO

August 1, 2018

Wells Fargo Bank has agreed to pay a civil penalty of $2.09 billion to settle allegations that it knowingly misrepresented the quality of its mortgage loans to investors, in violation of FIRREA, in order to double its production of subprime and Alt-A loans. Nearly half of those loans subsequently defaulted, leading to billions of dollars in losses for investors, including federally insured financial institutions. DOJ; USAO NDCA

March 29, 2018

Barclays Capital, Inc. and several of its affiliates agreed to pay $2 billion to settle claims of violating  (together, Barclays) to settle claims of violating the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) relating to Barclays’ underwriting and issuance of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) between 2005 and 2007.  Specifically, the government alleged that Barclays caused billions of dollars in losses to investors by engaging in a fraudulent scheme to sell 36 RMBS deals, and that it misled investors about the quality of the mortgage loans backing those deals. DOJ

September 19, 2017

A judgment of roughly $296 million was awarded against the entities formerly known as Allied Home Mortgage Capital Corporation and Allied Home Mortgage Corporation and a judgment of roughly $25 million was awarded against Allied's president and CEO Jim Hodge, following a jury verdict that Allied and Hodge violated the False Claims Act and the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (“FIRREA”) for over a decade of fraudulent misconduct while participating in the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) mortgage insurance program.  According to the evidence presented at trial, Allied and Hodge abused the FHA mortgage insurance program by falsely certifying that thousands of high risk, low quality loans were eligible for FHA insurance and then submitting insurance claims to FHA when any of those loans defaulted.  The allegations originated in a whistleblower lawsuit filed under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.  The whistleblower will receive an award from the proceeds of the government's recovery. DOJ (SDNY)
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