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WB Group Successes

Members of the Constantine Cannon Whistleblower Lawyer Team have been responsible for a string of major whistleblower successes over more than a decade.  Please see our Whistleblower Team Successes page.

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Cisco Systems, Inc. – Government Contract Fraud/Non-Conforming Product ($8.6 million)

Constantine Cannon represented whistleblower James Glenn against Cisco in the first cybersecurity whistleblower case ever successfully resolved under the False Claims Act. Cisco Systems, Inc. agreed to an $8.6 million settlement to resolve allegations it knowingly sold vulnerable video surveillance software to federal, state and local government agencies, exposing government systems to the risk of unauthorized access and the manipulation of vital information. The whistleblower, who worked in Europe for a Cisco partner, had reported critical security vulnerabilities in the software to Cisco, but Cisco had continued to sell the technology to government entities, including the District of Columbia and 15 states, despite the fact that the software failed to comply with FAR procurement standards that require basic cybersecurity controls, including those set forth by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.  Read more: Press Release; Whistleblower Insider

Hyundai Oilbank Co., S-Oil Corporation, et al — Government Contract Fraud/Bid-Rigging ($363 million)

A team of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of an anonymous whistleblower who provided extensive assistance to the U.S. government in its criminal and civil cases against several Korean oil and transportation companies, for their roles in a conspiracy to artificially inflate prices on fuel contracts for U.S. military bases in South Korea. In November 2018, SK Energy Co. Ltd., GS Caltex Corporation, and Hanjin Transportation Co. Ltd. collectively agreed to pay $154 million, to resolve the False Claims Act allegations brought by Constantine Cannon’s client, and an additional $82 million in criminal fines for their involvement in the conspiracy the whistleblower exposed. And in March 2019, the Department of Justice announced that two additional companies, Hyundai Oilbank Co. Ltd and S-Oil Corporation, would pay $75 million in criminal fines and $52 million to resolve these same False Claims Act and antitrust violations. This brings the settlement totals to $363 million and is the largest False Claims Act antitrust recovery as well as the largest False Claims Act settlement involving bid-rigging to date. Read more here.

Skyline Urology — Healthcare Fraud ($2.1M)

Constantine Cannon represented a whistleblower in a qui tam lawsuit that alleged that from 2013 through 2016 a large urology practice had fraudulently and systematically misused a billing code in order to increase reimbursements from insurers, including Medicare and private insurers in California. The code, modifier 25, is properly used when a physician performs an evaluation and management service and a separate and distinct service on the same day. Billing with modifier 25 when no distinct service occurred can improperly inflate reimbursement rates and is known as “unbundling fraud.” The Federal Government recovered $1.85M and the State of California recovered $250,000 to resolve the allegations. For his efforts in uncovering the fraud, the whistleblower received a portion of both recoveries. See The National Law Review and Becker’s ASC Review for more.

Takata - Auto Safety ($1 billion)

Two former Takata employees, Mark Lillie and another man who chose to remain anonymous, provided extensive assistance to the U.S. government in its criminal case against Takata, the maker of defective airbags which exploded and claimed the lives of 22 people and set off a worldwide recall of nearly 100 million airbag inflators.  In January 2017, Takata pled guilty to wire fraud and agreed to pay $1 billion in criminal penalties stemming from the company’s fraudulent conduct in relation to sales of defective airbag inflators. The criminal action also resulted in three high-level Takata executives pleading guilty to wire fraud and conspiracy charges. The awards to the whistleblowers were the first ever made under the Motor Vehicle Safety Whistleblower Act, a federal whistleblower-reward program.  Read more here.

Pure Collection – Customs Fraud ($908,100)

Constantine Cannon represented whistleblower Andrew Patrick, who worked for Pure Collection from 2010 to 2014, first as a sales representative in its U.K. call center and then in its U.K. packaging department. Mr. Patrick’s qui tam, or whistleblower, lawsuit alleged that since 2007 the defendants fraudulently and systematically avoided paying U.S. customs duties on its goods shipped from the United Kingdom to customers in the United States. Pure Collection and the e-retailer’s acting CEO, Samantha Harrison, have collectively agreed to a settlement of $908,100 to the U.S. Government. This lawsuit was one of the first to be brought by a U.K. whistleblower in which the U.S. Government intervened and successfully resolved the whistleblower’s False Claims Act allegations. Mr. Patrick will be awarded 18 percent of the total settlement.

Freedom Health, Optimum Healthcare - Medicare Risk Adjustment ($32.5 M)

Two of our whistleblower lawyers led the representation of the late Dr. Darren Sewell, M.D., the former chief medical officer and vice president of special projects for two large health insurers and operators of Medicare managed healthcare insurance plans based in Tampa, Florida. Dr. Sewell brought a qui tam case under the False Claims Act against Freedom, Optimum and Mr. Pagidipati alleging that they improperly gamed a feature of the Medicare Advantage program known as risk adjustment, or risk scoring, by fraudulently inflating their members’ risk scores and the corresponding risk adjustment payments they received from CMS, and that they fraudulently induced CMS to allow them to expand their health insurance offerings into new counties in Florida and the Carolinas by falsely representing that they had a sufficient network of doctors, clinics and hospitals available to serve their enrollees in the expanded service areas when they had no such networks in place. The Government joined the case and in 2017, defendants agreed to pay $32.5 million to settle the matter. The Government and the whistleblower are in the process of negotiating the amount of the relator’s share of the Government’s $32.5 million recovery that Dr. Sewell’s estate will receive. See NPR, DOJ for more.

Bay Sleep Clinic – Medicare Fraud/Unapproved Facilities, Unlicensed Technicians, and Physician Kickbacks ($2.6M).

Constantine Cannon represented whistleblower Elma Dresser, a sleep technician and former Bay Sleep employee. Ms. Dresser alleged that Bay Sleep Clinic and associated businesses, a network of sleep clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area, fraudulently billed Medicare for sleep studies conducted by unlicensed technicians in unapproved locations; improperly dispensed durable medical equipment from unapproved locations using unlicensed technicians; and paid doctors for referrals in violation of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute. The government joined a portion of the case, and in 2016, defendants agreed to pay $2.6 million to settle the matter. For her significant contributions, the relator’s share award was almost 21% of the government’s recovery. See DOJ for more.

Zwanger-Pesiri Radiology – Medicare and Medicaid Fraud ($10.5M).

Two of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Linda Gibb and Donna Geraci, former billing specialists at Zwanger-Pesiri Radiology in Long Island, New York. Ms. Geraci and Ms. Gibb brought a qui tam action under the False Claims Act (FCA) against Zwanger-Pesiri, alleging the company defrauded the government by performing unnecessary testing, charging for services not performed, and using uncredentialed physicians. The government joined the case, and in 2016, Zwanger-Pesiri paid $8.1M to settle civil allegations in the FCA case, as well as $2.4M in related criminal forfeiture. Ms. Geraci and Ms. Gibb received a whistleblower award of $1.25M collectively. See DOJ for more.

Roof Systems of Maine – Government Contracting Fraud/Noncompliance with contract requirements ($439,500).

Two of our whistleblower attorneys led the representation of Brian Emery, an experienced roofer and former subcontractor to Roof Systems of Maine. Mr. Emery brought a qui tam action under the False Claims Act against Roof Systems of Maine alleging the company defrauded the government by violating contract requirements and industry standards in roofing and siding work done on behalf of the Departments of the Army and Navy, and the National Guard Bureau. According to the complaint, Roof Systems systematically used inferior products and improper installation techniques at three building sites along the Maine coast. The government joined the case, and in 2016, Roof Systems paid $439,500 to settle the case. Mr. Emery received a whistleblower award of $79,110. See Morning Sentinel for more.

Education Management Corp. - For-profit college student recruitment violations ($80 million)

Education Management Corporation (EDMC), a Pittsburgh-based operator of for-profit educational institutions, agreed to pay more than $80 million to settle a False Claims Act lawsuit brought by a whistleblower represented by attorneys at Constantine Cannon.   The settlement was the largest settlement to date in an FCA suit involving the U.S. Department of Education.  The whistleblowers, Lynntoya Washington and Michael T. Mahoney, provided extensive evidence that EDMC had for years paid its recruiters incentive compensation based upon how many students they enrolled, regardless of whether the students were suitable candidates, while steadily concealing its illegal practices with repeated false statements to state and federal authorities. Read more here and from the DOJ.
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