Have a Claim?

Click here for a confidential contact or call:

1-212-350-2774

Whistleblower Quiz

Would you blow the whistle?

Take our Quiz

Whistleblower Successes

Whistleblower reward laws and whistleblower reward programs enable qualifying whistleblowers to recover anywhere from 10 to 30 percent of the government’s recovery. These whistleblower reward laws include: the federal False Claims Act; State False Claims Acts; the Securities and Exchange Commission Whistleblower Program; the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Whistleblower Program; and, the Internal Revenue Service Whistleblower Program. We have collected summaries of recent successes in cases brought by whistleblowers, and you can read them below. You can also review our annual Top Ten Lists.

Members of the Constantine Cannon Whistleblower Lawyer Team have served as lead counsel on cases that have recovered roughly $1.3 billion for the government and hundreds of millions in whistleblower awards. You can read more about the results we have achieved for our clients in Our Successes.

If you believe you have information about fraud which could give rise to a claim for a whistleblower reward, please contact us to speak with one of our experienced whistleblower attorneys.

December 1, 2021

A collection of hospices known as Crossroads Hospice has agreed to pay $5.5 million to settle allegations raised in two qui tam suits by former employees Leanne Malone, Jackie Burns, and Angela Heck, and a home health physician in Tennessee, Dr. David Weber.  In their lawsuits, the whistleblowers alleged that between 2012 and 2014, Crossroads billed Medicare for hospice care for patients who were not terminally ill, including patients with Alzheimer’s or dementia.  Malone, Burns, and Heck will divide a million-dollar relator’s share.  USAO WDTN

November 23, 2021

A number of related entities operating in Ohio and Tennessee as Crossroads Hospice have agreed to pay $5.5 million to resolve allegations that they submitted false claims for hospice services that were not covered by Medicare.  Specifically, the government alleged that over a period of three years, Crossroads submitted claims for dementia or Alzheimer’s patients who were not terminally ill for at least a portion of the more than three years that the patients received care.  Two qui tam actions were filed regarding the false claims; the three individuals who jointly filed the first action, Leanne Malone, Jackie Burns and Angela Heck, were previously employees of Crossroads, and will receive approximately $1.045 millionDOJ

November 22, 2021

Two whistleblowers who provided the SEC with new and significant information during an existing investigation, including information about misconduct occurring in different geographic areas, received awards of approximately $6.2 million and $1.3 million.  The award to the first claimant was also based in part on a recovery in a related action, based on findings that the whistleblower provided information to the relevant other agency.  In support of the first claimant’s larger award, the SEC also cited that their information was more significant, that the majority of the relief ordered was based on information provided by them, that they reported their concerns internally prior than reporting to the SEC, and they reported more expeditiously.  SEC

November 22, 2021

Home health provider PruittHealth, Inc. has agreed to pay $4.2 million to resolve allegations that they knowingly submitted false claims for services that were not eligible for reimbursement because, among other things, they did not have the required face-to-face certifications or plans of care, and they did not document the beneficiary’s homebound status or need for the home health services.  Tina Peery, who initiated the government action by filing a qui tam complaint, will receive an award of $700,000USAO ND Ga

November 22, 2021

Two whistleblowers received awards totaling approximately $1 million, with the CFTC finding that the first claimant voluntarily provided specific, credible, and timely information that led the CFTC to open an investigation, and the second claimant voluntarily provided information that significantly contributed to the success of the covered action.  In support of a larger award for the first claimant, the CFTC cited their submission of documents and sharing of knowledge during the earliest stages of the CFTC’s investigation, which focused investigative efforts and conserved government time and resources.  CFTC

November 15, 2021

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans will pay $1.05 million to resolve allegations that it falsely certified damage description and repair estimates in connection with claims for federal funds for the repair of facilities damaged by Hurricane Katrina.  Claims against federal contractor AECOM, which prepared the estimates, are continuing.  The Archdiocese is in bankruptcy, and the settlement amount is based on an “ability to pay” determination.  The action was initiated by the filing of a whistleblower complaint by AECOM employee Robert Romero, who will receive a whistleblower award of approximately $200,000.  DOJ; USAO EDLA  See earlier settlement

November 9, 2021

Numerous anesthesia providers and outpatient surgery centers in Georgia, including Ambulatory Anesthesia of Atlanta, LLC and Northside Anesthesiology Consultants, LLC, have agreed to pay over $28 million to resolve kickback allegations by whistleblowers Kathleen Hartney-Velazco, M.D., Jan Kersey, and Capitol Anesthesiology, P.C., who will receive a $4.7 million cut of the settlement.  According to the whistleblowers, the anesthesia providers made payments and provided free staffing to the outpatient surgery centers in order to obtain exclusivity contracts over a ten-year period.  USAO NDGA
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 71

Learn about Whistleblower Rewards Programs